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Misleading commmercials : The recurring natural flavors theme

  1. Jul 3, 2008 #1

    GCT

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    Misleading commmercials : The recurring "natural flavors " theme

    The other day I was at Taco Bell and noticed their ad for the Fruitista beverage made of "natural flavors". One thing to note about "natural flavors" is that it is not the same thing as real fruit juice and thus there is no real "nutritional content" ; no vitamins and

    NO REAL FRUIT CONTENT .

    Same thing with the new 7 up commercial. The product has improved certainly in the sense that their are no artificial flavors or preservatives and this is why they "believe" that the product is "natural" .

    So beware folks

    It's "natural" if it isn't artificial - that is if there are no preservatives.
     
    Last edited: Jul 3, 2008
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  3. Jul 3, 2008 #2

    Moonbear

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    Re: Misleading commmercials : The recurring "natural flavors " theme

    Actually, it's worse than that I think. Natural flavors just means the flavoring is from a natural source, it means NOTHING about what else has gone into it. It can have preservatives. A lot of sodas have "natural and artificial flavoring" as ingredients. So, the natural part really means very little. It could be a little lemon extract.
     
  4. Jul 3, 2008 #3
    Re: Misleading commmercials : The recurring "natural flavors " theme

    Rant, much? LOL
     
  5. Jul 3, 2008 #4

    Evo

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    Re: Misleading commmercials : The recurring "natural flavors " theme

    The term "natural flavors" means nothing to me, I don't even notice it.

    Another misconception is that something has to be 100% fruit juice. :rolleyes: You could not drink 100% cranberry juice. Just like lemonade is not 100% lemon juice. But back in the 60's and 70's certain "health conscious" people condemned Ocean Spray Cranberry Juice Cocktail for not being 100% cranberry juice. What the hell were they thinking?
     
  6. Jul 3, 2008 #5
    Re: Misleading commmercials : The recurring "natural flavors " theme

    Well, duh man.

    Natural Flavors != All natural.

    This ant nothing new.
     
  7. Jul 3, 2008 #6

    GCT

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    Re: Misleading commmercials : The recurring "natural flavors " theme

    Yeah with 7up they have the green acres fruit farm setting with the flatulating bunnies to mislead people in processing the "natural" term and with Taco Bell it's all of the fruit in the background. It's all a bit dispicable ; they know what people are immediately going to conjure up with the term "natural" and they advocate for this sense of valuing the environment in their ads while knowing that their product is not environmentally relevant whatsoever .
     
  8. Jul 3, 2008 #7

    Moonbear

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    Re: Misleading commmercials : The recurring "natural flavors " theme

    Oh, now they sell "100% Juice" but if you read the ingredients, you find that whatever kind of juice it is, they're mixing with either apple or grape juice, both of which are cheap and very sweet.

    I do get 100% pomegranate juice, which is rather expensive, and no, you couldn't drink it straight (though I suppose some people do). I just don't like the ones with apple and grape juice mixed in (I've never liked either...love apple cider, hate apple juice)...they start to taste too much like fruit punch. I like pomegranate martinis, so mix it in that, or else I add a splash of the juice to either tonic water or club soda (club soda when I'm trying to watch calories, but I like the taste of tonic water better).

    Of course, when it says cranberry juice "cocktail" I automatically assume the "cocktail" part is that other stuff besides cranberry is in there. But, for some reason, even that is hard to find anymore. Everything is cran-apple, cran-grape, cran-something. :yuck: I just want one fruit juice at a time.
     
  9. Jul 3, 2008 #8

    Moonbear

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    Re: Misleading commmercials : The recurring "natural flavors " theme

    That's what advertising is all about. It's just like all the people who buy into the whole "Not tested on animals" scam...sure, that particular product isn't tested on animals, because it contains no ingredients that haven't been thoroughly tested long before that product was developed. :rolleyes: But, hey, if they can convince people to pay 4 times as much for the same product because they believe there's something special about it, more power to them.
     
  10. Jul 3, 2008 #9
    Re: Misleading commmercials : The recurring "natural flavors " theme

    I can certainly drink 100% pure orange juice, since I do it myself on weekends. But on weekdays I am a bit lazzy. So I buy this juice from the fresh section which says (100%) "pure" (not from concentrate).

    In France the law forbids the use of "pure" if the product contains either colorant, preservative, or any other kind of (chemical) additional "ingredient". Basically, it can only be the same as homemade. Is there any such thing here ? What would "organic" mean for instance ?
     
  11. Jul 3, 2008 #10
    Re: Misleading commmercials : The recurring "natural flavors " theme

    It means you got ripped off paying more for 'organic' sucka!

    Here, you can sell bottled water by filling up the bottles from your hose in your garden.

    Technically, organic is supposed to mean they dont use pesticides or other chemicals when growing the foods.
     
  12. Jul 3, 2008 #11

    Moonbear

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    Re: Misleading commmercials : The recurring "natural flavors " theme

    Shhhhh...you're going to spoil it for my friend who raises organic sheep and cattle in Wales. :biggrin: He's doing quite well for himself. When he moved back to Wales from the US about 6 or 7 years ago, he decided to convert the family farm over to organic production because people were willing to pay so much more for the meat or milk that he didn't have to raise nearly as many animals to make the same profit.
     
  13. Jul 3, 2008 #12
    Re: Misleading commmercials : The recurring "natural flavors " theme

    I thought even the U.S. of A. had a law about that :
    National Organic Program (wiki)
     
  14. Jul 3, 2008 #13

    Moonbear

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    Re: Misleading commmercials : The recurring "natural flavors " theme

    If it's USDA certified organic, then that indicates specific practices have been adhered to, like not using any chemical fertilizers or pesticides. But if it's not USDA certified, organic can still mean anything. And, none of it necessarily means it's better for the environment or more nutritious or any of the other myths that go along with the organic label. I think a bullet still counts as organic pest control, for example.
     
  15. Jul 3, 2008 #14

    Evo

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    Re: Misleading commmercials : The recurring "natural flavors " theme

    :rofl: :rofl: <snork, snork>

    Botulism and salmonella are 100% organic, so is e-coli.
     
  16. Jul 3, 2008 #15
    Re: Misleading commmercials : The recurring "natural flavors " theme

    Oh I see. So until I made it clear that what I call "organic" needs a US government stamp, it was assumed I would buy it written by hand on a sticker.

    By the same token, until I explain to you that I have real concerns, such as the use of hormones and/or antibiotics for instance, you will explain me that organic food can very well travel on a plane.

    I'm sorry to get irritated by Cyrus calling me sucka. This is just not the spirit in which I discuss with friends.
     
  17. Jul 3, 2008 #16
    Re: Misleading commmercials : The recurring "natural flavors " theme

    The CFR has a definition for natural flavor:

    The definition of “natural flavor” under the Code of Federal Regulations is: “the essential oil, oleoresin, essence or extractive, protein hydrolysate, distillate, or any product of roasting, heating or enzymolysis, which contains the flavoring constituents derived from a spice, fruit or fruit juice, vegetable or vegetable juice, edible yeast, herb, bark, bud, root, leaf or similar plant material, meat, seafood, poultry, eggs, dairy products, or fermentation products thereof, whose significant function in food is flavoring rather than nutritional” (21CFR101.22).

    Yum I just love protein hydrolysate.:yuck:
     
  18. Jul 3, 2008 #17
    Re: Misleading commmercials : The recurring "natural flavors " theme

    I didnt call you a sucka, fool.

    Why you hasslin me B?
     
  19. Jul 3, 2008 #18

    Evo

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    Re: Misleading commmercials : The recurring "natural flavors " theme

    Oh, that's just Cyrus, please don't be offended.

    "Organic" is a very misused and misunderstood term in the US. All it really means is what Moonbear said. People in the US think there are more vitamins and nutrients in organic food, they don't understand it just means the food has more bugs and bacteria on it. Well, I guess the bugs do provide added nutrients.
     
  20. Jul 3, 2008 #19
    Re: Misleading commmercials : The recurring "natural flavors " theme

    I meant, the other Cyrus.
     
  21. Jul 3, 2008 #20

    Moonbear

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    Re: Misleading commmercials : The recurring "natural flavors " theme

    In the US, we certainly do see "organic" written on lots of things that are not certified in any way. It's meaningless under those circumstances, and I think that's what Cyrus is getting at.

    Huh? I don't have such concerns, but I don't know what the plane comment means or where that comes from. There are adequate withdrawal times for any antibiotic treatments for non-"organic" foods that you're not going to get any residues in your food, and if the animals were left "intact" they'd have more hormones than what they are treated with when castrated (except the males are given estrogens, but still in doses lower than females would have). For all the people that need to be fed, production practices that require more land, more expense, and more labor are not a good way of securing the food supply.

    By now you should know not to take Cyrus too seriously when he makes comments like that. At least I don't. :wink:

    There are people who think "organic" automatically means healthier or more nutritious, and it really doesn't. And it really is incredibly overpriced, because there are consumers willing to pay way too much for food that has and "organic" sticker on it based on the misconception it is somehow healthier to eat or better for the environment. Organic production faces some serious limitations that I think makes it less healthy still. One of those problems is that they can't use dewormers on animals, so they end up full of worms and anemic, with really pale meat. There are management practices that can alleviate that, but it means using MUCH more land for grazing than other production methods, so I think more harmful to the environment, or at least more wasteful of limited land for farming. When it comes to vegetables, it's even more silly. Instead of balanced fertilizers, they spread on manure with all the bacteria in it that fertilizers were developed to protect us from. It's a step backward instead of forward in food safety.
     
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