Model of the Universe/Multiverse

In summary, the conversation discusses Stephen Hawking's last publication and its findings on the model of universe/multiverse. It also explores the concept of infinite space and the potential merging of multiverses. However, there are no existing models that support this idea. The thread is then closed.
  • #1
Tree Universe
3
1
Hi Everyone,

One of Hawking's last publications studied the model of universe/multiverse and conjectured that the exit from eternal inflation is "finite and reasonably smooth" - in other words, the inflated boundaries of multiverses could be finite and smooth. Here is the paper link - https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/JHEP04(2018)147.

Does any existing model suggest that there are multiverses inflating in infinite space and eventually merging into bigger universes after a long time, just like aerosols growing and merging in the atmosphere? The universe has such a large radius that it could flatten out like a drop.
 
Space news on Phys.org
  • #2
Tree Universe said:
The universe has such a large radius that it could flatten out like a drop.
Uh ... the universe has a radius? Really? What is it? Are we at the center? If not, where IS the center?
 
  • #3
phinds said:
If not, where IS the center?

Fresno.
 
  • Like
Likes Ibix, davenn and phinds
  • #4
Vanadium 50 said:
Fresno.
Road Trip! :cool:
 
  • Like
Likes davenn and phinds
  • #5
Vanadium 50 said:
Fresno.

berkeman said:
Road Trip! :cool:

Next thing I know you guys will be telling me the radius is 42
 
  • Like
Likes davenn and berkeman
  • #6
Tree Universe said:
just like aerosols growing and merging in the atmosphere? The universe has such a large radius that it could flatten out like a drop.

In case it isn't obvious from the previous posts, the answer is "no". There are no models that work like this.

Thread closed.
 

1. What is the "Model of the Universe/Multiverse"?

The "Model of the Universe/Multiverse" is a scientific framework that attempts to explain the origins, structure, and evolution of the universe or multiple universes. It is based on observations, theories, and mathematical models developed through centuries of scientific research.

2. How do scientists study the "Model of the Universe/Multiverse"?

Scientists use various methods and techniques to study the "Model of the Universe/Multiverse". These include observations from telescopes and satellites, experiments in particle accelerators, and simulations using advanced computer models. Scientists also collaborate and share data from different fields of study to gain a better understanding of the universe.

3. Is there more than one "Model of the Universe/Multiverse"?

Yes, there are multiple models proposed by scientists to explain the universe. Some models suggest a single universe, while others propose the existence of a multiverse with multiple universes. Each model has its own set of assumptions, predictions, and evidence. Scientists continue to refine and test these models to understand the universe better.

4. What are some key components of the "Model of the Universe/Multiverse"?

The "Model of the Universe/Multiverse" has several key components, including the Big Bang theory, dark matter and energy, inflation, and cosmic microwave background radiation. The Big Bang theory suggests that the universe began as a singularity and has been expanding ever since. Dark matter and energy are mysterious components that make up most of the universe's mass and energy. Inflation is a period of rapid expansion that occurred in the early universe, and cosmic microwave background radiation is the leftover radiation from the Big Bang.

5. What are some current debates and challenges in the "Model of the Universe/Multiverse"?

Some current debates and challenges in the "Model of the Universe/Multiverse" include understanding the nature of dark matter and energy, the role of inflation in the early universe, and the possibility of a multiverse. Other challenges include reconciling different theories of gravity and finding a unified theory that explains all the forces in the universe. Scientists continue to work on these challenges through ongoing research and collaboration.

Similar threads

Replies
3
Views
1K
Replies
28
Views
3K
Replies
1
Views
754
  • Cosmology
Replies
5
Views
2K
Replies
1
Views
1K
  • Beyond the Standard Models
Replies
2
Views
2K
  • Cosmology
Replies
4
Views
1K
  • Beyond the Standard Models
Replies
1
Views
912
  • Beyond the Standard Models
Replies
4
Views
3K
Replies
1
Views
1K
Back
Top