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Modelling wavelike properties of a particle

  1. Apr 23, 2013 #1
    One way to model the wavelike property of a trapped particle is to have it do something (say expand and contract) on a periodic basis as it travels though space. Assuming the periodic expansion and contraction matches the wavelength of the particle, it will "interfere" with other particles the same way different parts of a wave interfere with each other. An example of 40 particles with interference is at http://youtu.be/Fg3ifqBNDB8

    An example of a single particle acting as a wave is at http://youtu.be/yPC5lxCXOkM

    If there are concerns with this type of model, can those be elaborated on here?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 23, 2013 #2

    sophiecentaur

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    Those movies are just a simulation. They seem to assume a size / extent for a photon and that the size somehow varies with position. The act of making a simulation doesn't justify the model so I would need to see something more. As it stands, it makes no real sense to me.
     
  4. Apr 23, 2013 #3
    I am a computer programmer with access to significant and varied 3d animation software. My only hope here is to properly model, in this case, the phase of the photon. I appreciate anyone familiar with photon properties pointing out any errors.

    Each photon is derived from its energy based on the Planck constant, where the example shows a 1.97ev photon (1240/1.97=630nm) will travel at the speed of light, 3x10^8 m/s and expand and contract at a rate of 4.8x10^14 times per second. Locations are tracked and real time in femtoseconds is shown at the bottom.

    As I understand the photon, it has a time varying chance of being reflected by a surface, or of being absorbed by an electron. This is reflected in the model as the photons size as it travels through space becoming bigger and smaller. The photon is its own antiparticle. This is reflected in the model as the photon going from dark to light to dark on a 1/2 wavelength basis.

    This way, groups of photons can be modelled as coherent or incoherent, where the example is of the creation of 40 coherent photons.

    This is a natural model of wave interference, where you see dark photons reinforcing other dark photons that are one wavelength away from the wall. You can model all types of interference this way where for example, two photons crossing each other that are 1/2 wavelength out of phase will cancel each other out.
     
  5. Apr 23, 2013 #4

    ZapperZ

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    A photon does not expand and contract. There is no theory that espouses that, and there are no experiment that would even suggest that. That is the fatal error in your understanding and interpretation of the videos.

    Zz.
     
  6. Apr 23, 2013 #5
    Thank you, would you agree that "a photon has a time varying chance of being reflected by a surface, or of being absorbed by an electron." and "The photon is its own antiparticle on a 1/2 wavelength basis."

    What are your thoughts on the 2d representation of photons going up and down like a small little wave? Isn't that the same sort of big/small cycle or particle/antiparticle cycle representation?
     
  7. Apr 23, 2013 #6

    ZapperZ

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    A photon cannot be absorbed by an electron, if that is a free electron. An photon being absorbed by an atom, resulting in an excited stated represented by an electron in a higher energy state, is an absorption by the entire atom, not just by the electron.

    The part where a photon antiparticle on a 1/2 wavelength basis is something you probably made up on your own and thus, is utterly puzzling.

    I think your attempt at doing this representation is not going to be correct or accurate.

    Zz.
     
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