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Most Distant Galaxy EVER Discovered

  1. Oct 23, 2013 #1
    Last edited by a moderator: May 6, 2017
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 23, 2013 #2

    Chronos

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    Yep, but, the Milky Way has that beat. It formed a mere ~500 million years after the BB.
     
  4. Oct 28, 2013 #3

    OmCheeto

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    It's amazing how ignorant I am. I always thought stars burned for billions of years.

    Metal content implies at least 2nd generation stars, so relatively short lived stars had to supernovae to create the stars in this 700 million year old galaxy.

    I've spent over 2 hours googling and finally found my answer:

    I wonder how big a telescope we would need to see the first generation stars?

    Never mind. It was in the next paragraph. :redface:

     
  5. Oct 28, 2013 #4

    Chronos

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    The JWST will be amazing. It is iffy if it will be able to detect any primordial supernova. It would be fascinating if it could.
     
  6. Oct 29, 2013 #5

    OmCheeto

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    We were discussing the big bang theory in another thread this morning. Then, on my drive into work this morning, this thread came to mind. I was thinking that a solar birth rate of 1 per day, was pretty stellar, compared to our 1 per year. I thought to myself, that you should post that birth rate in the BBT FAQ.


    But then I thought some more about this, and decided that they'd just discovered the galaxy a week ago. How on earth did they figure out a 300/yr sbr, from only a weeks worth of data?

    I decided that you cosmos people might be messing with my mind.

    I no longer believe in the big bang theory. :tongue:

    ------------------------------
    ps. I found another thing that I will miss when I retire. I have access to Nature, for free.
     
  7. Oct 29, 2013 #6

    mfb

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    Millions to trillions, billions are a good estimate :p.

    You can't see "oh look, there is a new star!" anyway, the formation process takes thousands to millions of years. You can estimate how many stars with which lifetime there are, and calculate the formation rate based on that number. If there are 300 million stars which life for 1 million years each, and the star formation rate was stable the last million years, there are 300 new stars per year (simplified description).
     
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