Name the 11 dimensions in M-Theory.

  1. Through a period of 60 years we developed quantum physics that enables us to imagine far beyond the capacity of an ordinary human mind. Quantum physics developed several String theories that were united in creation of M-Theory. M-Theory invovles 11 dimensions including the 4 dimensions that control our natural world (length, breadth, height, and time). I was wondering if someone can provide me with the names, measurement, and describtion of the other 7. Thank you for your answer and time.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. i am a new to the world of physics and i would really much like to understand stuff that i don't quite seem to understand but can reason with. so please be cautious if i mentioned anything out of hand and sounding "dumb". thank you =X
     
  4. Four dimensions: [tex]x,y,z,t[/tex]
    7 other dimensions : [tex]w_1,w_2,w_3,w_4,w_5,w_6,w_7[/tex]
     
  5. Fredrik

    Fredrik 10,155
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    They don't have names, and they haven't been measured. I don't know string theory, but the elegant universe describes the 10-dimensional spacetime as the familiar 4-dimensional spacetime with a 6-dimensional Calabi-Yau space attached to each point. It isn't really possible for someone who hasn't studied a lot of math to understand what that is. The 11th dimension of M-theory is apparently something even stranger.
     
  6. It has been argued that time may infact be 3 dimensions and not one. That past, present and future are like hight width and depth leaving 5 dimensions to be named instead of 7.
     
  7. Fredrik

    Fredrik 10,155
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    That makes no sense at all. The extra dimensions in the string theories are spatial dimensions, and your claim isn't even consistent with the definition of the word "dimension".
     
  8. This question is asked in here often enough I think maybe the Authorities should consider finding a really good explanation and making it a FAQ sticky or something.
     
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