Naming a Compound: Understanding C(CH3)3 and Its Naming Conventions

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In summary, this compound has the longest carbon chain possible and it is named in a way that the sum of the numbers assigned to C atoms bearing functional groups is minimum.
  • #1
jinhuit95
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Hi, I need help in naming this compound. Firstly, can someone explain to me what it means my C(CH3)3. Does it means its a C connected to 3 methyl groups?

I would name it 2-bromo-4-dimethyl-6-trimethyloctane but apparently the answer i was given is :
7-bromo-3-ethyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethyloctane or 2-bromo-6-tert-butyl-4,4-dimethyloctane

Can someone explain to me why is it name that way?

Thanks.
 
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  • #3
Hey, firstly yes your C(CH3)3 means the carbon atom is connected to 3 methyl groups.
Then as for your question regarding the naming, first you have to select the longest carbon chain possible. When u select the longest chain and number the C atoms,u should number them in a way that the sum of the numbers assigned to C atoms bearing functional groups is minimum.
I'll now explain with the example.
In the above compound, the longest carbon chain can be the one starting from the Church attached to three methyl groups and towards the left corner of the compound.Then before naming u should number all C atoms.If u start numbering from the left most corner, u will get 2+4+4+6+7+7=30 as the sum of the numbers assigned to C atoms bearing functional groups. But if u start numbering from the C atom that bears three methyl groups, u will get, 2+2+3+5+5+7=24 as the sum of numbers assigned to C atoms bearing functional groups.As u can see, 30>24. So u should number the C chain starting from the C atom attached to three methyl groups.
Now for the naming.
When naming u should start from the functional group of which its first letter comes first in the alphabet.So then it will be exactly the answer that u were given with.I have uploaded a photo for u to get a clear idea of the above explanation.
 

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Related to Naming a Compound: Understanding C(CH3)3 and Its Naming Conventions

1. What is the purpose of naming compounds?

Naming compounds is important because it allows us to accurately communicate and identify specific chemical substances. This is especially important in research and industry settings where precise identification is necessary.

2. How do I know if a compound is ionic or covalent?

Ionic compounds are formed between a metal and a nonmetal, while covalent compounds are formed between two nonmetals. The type of bonding between elements can also be determined by their electronegativity values. Metals typically have lower electronegativity, while nonmetals have higher electronegativity.

3. What is the difference between a compound's systematic name and a common name?

A compound's systematic name is based on a set of rules established by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) to ensure consistency and accuracy in naming. Common names, on the other hand, are often used in everyday language and may vary depending on the region or language.

4. How do I name a compound with a polyatomic ion?

To name a compound with a polyatomic ion, first determine the charge of the ion and write it as a Roman numeral in parentheses after the cation's name. Then, write the name of the anion as it appears in the periodic table, followed by the suffix -ide. For example, Fe(NO3)2 would be named iron(II) nitrate.

5. Can a compound have more than one name?

Yes, a compound can have multiple names depending on the naming system being used. For example, the compound H2O can also be referred to as dihydrogen monoxide or water. However, it is important to use the systematic name to avoid confusion and ensure accuracy.

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