Natural Spectrum of the Universe?

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Does anyone know where I might find the natural spectrum of bodies in the universe? Something like http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/27/Spectrum_of_Sunlight_en.svg as a sum of all known stars, black holes, pulsars, solar winds on planetary atmospheres, etc covering the entire spectrum?
 

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  • #2
Chronos
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I assume you are interested in the relative contribution of energy density from all sources. For starlight, including energy absorbed and re-radiated by 'dust', it is comprises about 10% of the CMB energy density (re: http://condor.depaul.edu/asarma/Teaching/Spring2012/PHY475/LEC475/Lec8apr18.pdf).
Specifically I'm interested in knowing if there are any frequencies that don't occur naturally - though a graph of observed spectra would be a nice start.
 
  • #4
bapowell
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"Entire spectrum" of what?
 
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Specifically I'm interested in knowing if there are any frequencies that don't occur naturally
There are not.
 
  • #6
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There are not.
It would still be nice to have a graph of the spectrums seen with relative amplitudes.
 
  • #7
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"Entire spectrum" of what?
The EM spectrum - what this post is about.
 
  • #8
Chronos
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What part of the CMB spectrum do you find objectionable? Do you think it filters out other background contributions- like from stars and dust? If so, provide citations.
 
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It would still be nice to have a graph of the spectrums seen with relative amplitudes.
I am sorry that I didn't do all the work that you asked me to.
 
  • #10
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It would still be nice to have a graph of the spectrums seen with relative amplitudes.
This will depend heavily on your position. As an example: close to a star, the stellar spectrum is a good approximation for the total flux, while far away from stars (or even from galaxies) the CMB is more important. The other energy ranges depend on your position as well.
 
  • #11
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What part of the CMB spectrum do you find objectionable? Do you think it filters out other background contributions- like from stars and dust? If so, provide citations.
Nothing whatsoever - the issue is not having a graph of the relative amplitudes by frequency.
 
  • #12
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This will depend heavily on your position. As an example: close to a star, the stellar spectrum is a good approximation for the total flux, while far away from stars (or even from galaxies) the CMB is more important. The other energy ranges depend on your position as well.
This is a fair point - I guess I'm just looking for the best average across the universe as far as we can tell at this point.
 
  • #13
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http://www.pha.jhu.edu/~kgb/cosspec/ [Broken] is one for just the visual range.
 
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