New Meat Free Hamburger

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  • #1
BillTre
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This NY Times article discusses a new kind of fake meat hamberger which is being served art White Castle and soon at Berger King.
It is apparently difficult to tell from real hamberger.
They attribute it success at least in part to using heme (derived from beet roots) in it (red meat contains lots of heme).

I am looking forward to trying one when they come out in my area.
 
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  • #2
berkeman
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Mmm, you're making me hungry. My wife is a vegetarian, so we eat Grillers Prime hamburgers regularly. She is trying to find a source for the "Impossible Burgers" in the stores (coming soon in Cali), but this sounds good as well. I think the closest White Castle burger place is in San Francisco, though. Time for a road trip? :smile:
 
  • #3
gleem
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In addition to BK's "Impossible Burger" which may be a product of the California company Impossible Foods , Nestle will introduce its " Incredible Burger" in Europe under the Garden Gourmet brand this month and later in the year the "Awesome Burger" under the brand name "Sweet Earth" will be introduced in grocery stores in the US.

A year or two back a pea based meat substitute was introduced in the US by the company Beyond Meat and has received good reviews.
 
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  • #4
Klystron
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Kroger owns a/o supplies many grocery stores in my area similar to the SF Bay Area. I have seen plant based ground "meat" in the fresh meat section, possibly 'impossible meat'. I have not tried it since it cost much more than fresh vegetables and is sold in relatively large packages. I think the package mentioned 'heme'. I mainly eat vegetarian so do not need 'meat substitutes' but @BillTre makes it sound interesting.

I will buy some next time and prepare it like ground beef burgers.

FTR my favorite "burgers" are currently Golden spinach, sweet potato, or zucchini. They are tastier and cook faster than the usual soy and tempeh based garden burgers IMO. Bon appetite!
 
  • #5
StatGuy2000
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Mmm, you're making me hungry. My wife is a vegetarian, so we eat Grillers Prime hamburgers regularly. She is trying to find a source for the "Impossible Burgers" in the stores (coming soon in Cali), but this sounds good as well. I think the closest White Castle burger place is in San Francisco, though. Time for a road trip? :smile:

I've always been puzzled as to why vegetarians would purposely seek out veggie burgers that would taste like meat. If the whole goal is to avoid eating meat, why not simply eat tasty foods that have always been intended to be vegetarian?
 
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  • #6
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My wife is a veggie so I eat the stuff all the time. "Beyond" makes a beet and pea burger and I swear to god it tastes like like a real beef burger. It's quite expensive, but wow, they are extremely close to mirroring the taste and texture.
 
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  • #7
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I've always been puzzled as to why vegetarians would purposely seek out veggie burgers that would taste like meat. If the whole goal is to avoid eating meat, why not simply eat tasty foods that have always been intended to be vegetarian?
Many don't oppose the taste, but oppose the environmental effects or animal cruelty.
 
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  • #8
berkeman
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I've always been puzzled as to why vegetarians would purposely seek out veggie burgers that would taste like meat. If the whole goal is to avoid eating meat, why not simply eat tasty foods that have always been intended to be vegetarian?
In the case of my wife, she became a vegetarian in her 30's, I think, and misses the taste. And since the meat substitutes (the better ones) taste reasonable to me, it helps her to steer me away from meat a bit.
 
  • #9
gleem
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And then there is the concern for the negative health effects of consuming red meat.
 
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  • #10
cosmik debris
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I didn't know there were any burgers that tasted like real meat.

Cheers
 
  • #11
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I can't wait to try the impossible burger, can't wait!

They have the beyond burger @ Carl's Jr. and it is incredible. I love it! And I love beef burgers,yeah, it's really good.

Also someday I want to be civilized enough to get off meat completely (and having slaughtered animals in my conscience) but you know, bacon and barbeque, I can't quit you bb.
 
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  • #12
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Meant to say conscious, but conscience will work too ;)

A powerful storm is predicted to cross US next week with snow, rain, high winds and severe weather. Stay safe everyone.
 
  • #13
WWGD
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EDIT:This may sound self-serving but many animals benefit from domesticity. Mother Earth can be pretty brutal : no guarantee of food supply, plenty of predators, uncertain weather conditions. This benefit is exchanged by serving as a source of food. Sure that does not warrant living conditions they ate put in, but Peta has been known to exaggerate, if not lie at times, so it is hard to tell what really goes on.
 
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  • #14
WWGD
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One may argue that animals should have the option of living in the wild. But it is too late now that they have been domesticated and would not last long in the wild.
 
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  • #16
BillTre
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Most domesticated farmtype animals don't really have the choice to go back to the wild. They are physically controlled with fences and such.
Nor, if they got away, would they find much locally available land in which to resume their wild ways.
Some can, like boors and horses in particular places, but not everywhere.

My view of lab animal evolution can be extended to farm animals:
They are taking advantage of a new environmental niche which much is provided by human husbandrists (those taking care of the animals). They can evolve into this niche and become better adapted to it over time.
 
  • #17
Bandersnatch
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Some can, like boors and horses in particular places, but not everywhere.
We better keep boors domesticated, methinks. 😉
 
  • #18
WWGD
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Not the same as a factory farm :wink:
I understand, please read my full post. I agree that conditions should be humane, but it is difficult to tell what the real conditions are, as some animal rights groups have not been honest about this (Most groups overstate their case, same for PETA, others). If there is reliable evidence of inhumane conditions, processing centers should be penalized and ultimately closed if they do not comply.
 
  • #19
WWGD
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Most domesticated farmtype animals don't really have the choice to go back to the wild. They are physically controlled with fences and such.
Nor, if they got away, would they find much locally available land in which to resume their wild ways.
Some can, like boors and horses in particular places, but not everywhere.

My view of lab animal evolution can be extended to farm animals:
They are taking advantage of a new environmental niche which much is provided by human husbandrists (those taking care of the animals). They can evolve into this niche and become better adapted to it over time.
Would they be able to survive even if there was available land? After living in domesticity, they may lack the skills to do so. Wouldn't they?
 
  • #20
BillTre
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Depends upon what you are talking about. Clearly, horses, pigs, dble to breed without human help.ogs, and cats would be able to survive in at least some conditions.
Some domesticated animals are not even be able to breed without human help.
Some would be confronted with a local environment which fully packed with highly competitive animals seeking the same resources.
 
  • #21
Astronuc
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I was listening to an interview on Freakonomics (NPR) radio with Pat Brown, the founder of Impossible Foods, "essentially a tech startup, and it’s raised nearly $400 million to date in venture capital."
http://freakonomics.com/podcast/meat/
BROWN: So, we’ve only been in existence for about seven years and we have about 300 people. We started by basically building a team of some of the best scientists in the world to study how meat works, basically. And by that, I mean to really understand at a basic level the way, in my previous life, when I was a biomedical scientist, we might be studying how, you know, a normal cell of this particular kind becomes a cancer cell, understanding the basic biochemical mechanisms.

In this case, what we wanted to understand was: what are the basic biochemical mechanisms that account for the unique flavor chemistry and the flavor behavior and aromas and textures and juiciness and all those qualities that consumers value in meat? And we spent about 2.5 years just doing basic research, trying to answer that question, before we really started working on a product. And then decided for strategic reasons that our first product would be raw ground beef made entirely from plants.
Interesting information about "heme".

Brown has put a lot of thought and effort into the Impossible Burger. The interview is about 1/3 way down the page.

Toward the end of the article, there is a discussion with Kelly Fogarty, the executive vice president for the United States Cattlemen’s Association and a fifth- generation beef cattle rancher in Oakdale, California.
 
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  • #22
WWGD
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I guess I didn't parse the title correctly. New meat, free hamburger. Slightly disappointed at not getting a free hamburger :).
 
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  • #23
gleem
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There are many thing in life that I enjoy that carry some degree of risk and eating red meat is one of them. My brain won't let me hate meat but it does note red (npi) flags. As a scientist I pay attention to these red flags which produces an benefit/risk debate. Anything that tastes like the real thing (I often close my eyes when savoring a good steak) may help me reduce the risk. So I welcome the opportunity to try this new consumable material and look forward to its appearance in my neighborhood market. I was thinking maybe they should not have called it some sort of burger or meat substitute but something clever that might entice us to try it without a meat eaters bias.

I did some research on the beef industry. There are about 1.4B head of cattle on earth. Cattle graze in pasture until they weigh about 600 lbs when they are shipped to feed lots where they will consume about 2500 lbs of grain whose production my otherwise have been used for human consumption. While in the feed lot they are given antibiotics to ward off disease outbreak that might occur because of the close contact which could exacerbate the production of super bugs. They may be given artificial steroids to increase they market weight faster. The use of these hormones and their effects on humans is being debated in the US but not in Europe since their use was forbidden in 1985. Only about 500 lbs of the critter end up as what you see in the market thus 5lbs of grain are used for every pound of meat consumed. Cattle produce a lot of methane as we all know. The slaughter is generally humane certainly as compared to the fate they might have faced in the wild, strangulation or disembowelment. Finally the use of grain as a substantial source of food for cattle is producing a meat substantially higher in omega -6 fatty acids as compared to omega 3. The ratio of Ω- 6 to Ω-3 optimally should be about 3 to 2 but for grain fed beef this ratio is up to 7 to 1. High levels of Ω-6 promote inflammation which is contributory to may may health problems. Grass fed cattle have higher level of vitamin and other beneficial substances . Finally I think grass fed beef tastes better.

So it the interest of higher profit margins we have a food that is less nutritious, possibly harmful to health, contributes negatively to environmental and medical issues and, less efficient in the use of resources.
 
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  • #24
gmax137
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derived from beet roots
makes a beet and pea burger
I used to have lunch with my co-workers at a Greek/Pizza house, among the various cold-cut grinders* the menu offered "roast beet" which always made us laugh, as a harmless typo. Maybe they were ahead of their time?

* Connecticut-dialect for sub, hero, poboy, hoagie...
 
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  • #26
WWGD
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I tried the vegan thing for a while but I just did not feel full most of the time nor was I able to find tasty food. I don't have the budget to go to upscale vegetarian places or Indian restaurants, so I gave it up . I need to feel full and reasonably satisfied with food to go about my day. If they also come up with a good, reasonably -priced bacon substitute, will switch.
 
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  • #27
berkeman
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f they also come up with a good, reasonably -priced bacon, I will switch.
My wife and I enjoy this brand for breakfasts on the weekend... :smile:

242064
 
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  • #28
WWGD
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My wife and I enjoy this brand for breakfasts on the weekend... :smile:

View attachment 242064
Thanks. My wish was for a mutation of pigs resulting in an animal made of strips of cooked, crispy bacon and every time you took one, another would grow to replace it. Until my dream is realized, I will try your suggestion :).
 
  • #30
gleem
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Not to be outdone Nestles is planning to introduce its Awesome Burger in retail outlets and restaurants in the US later this year.

Beyond Meats (BYND) which may have been the first of the real meat tasting veggie burger company went public last week. Currently trading almost 180% above its opening price. I've seen their product in Target.
 
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  • #31
DaveC426913
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I believe A&W has a new "Beyond Meat" veggie burger.
Wife has tried it. She is not vegetarian, but she really liked it, and wants to go back for more.
 
  • #32
Klystron
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My wife is a veggie so I eat the stuff all the time. "Beyond" makes a beet and pea burger and I swear to god it tastes like like a real beef burger. It's quite expensive, but wow, they are extremely close to mirroring the taste and texture.
"Beyond" is available at my local groceries -- probably supplied by the same distributors as the Bay Area for non-local stuff -- but since I read this thread I have not found "Impossible".

The quest for a vegan burger is not just "taste like meat". Burgers form a subset of sandwiches: two slices of fresh bread, possibly spread with tasty condiments, usually layered with thin slices of fresh (or pickled) vegetables such as lettuce, cucumbers, tomatoes but with some tasty protein core; i.e, the burger.

Meat and fish eaters have many choices; vegetarians not so many for this particular form. :smile:
 
  • #33
berkeman
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The quest for a vegan burger is not just "taste like meat". Burgers form a subset of sandwiches: two slices of fresh bread, possibly spread with tasty condiments, usually layered with thin slices of fresh (or pickled) vegetables such as lettuce, cucumbers, tomatoes but with some tasty protein core; i.e, the burger.
Oh great, now I'm all hungry... o0)
 
  • #34
George Jones
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I like vegetarian food, but I also love meat. Consequently I filled in a missing (implied) title element differently than the OP intended.

The OP meant an implied hyphen in the thread's title: "New Meat-Free Hamburger"

When this thread first appeared, I mentally filled in the missing title element with a comma or semicolon: "New Meat, Free Hamburger"

Very different meanings. :biggrin:

"Eats, Shoots and Leaves"
 
  • #35
BillTre
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Here is a NY Times article that is a follow-up that looks at which restaurant chains are doing what WRT meat-free food. It also describes Arby's vegetable-free carrot (made from chicken breast, including pictures showing how it is made) as part of a meat-free backlash.
246758
 
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