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Newest exoplanet close enough to study its potential atmosphere

  1. Nov 12, 2015 #1

    DaveC426913

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  3. Nov 12, 2015 #2

    Chronos

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    I reviewed this paper earler today and it is quite interesting. Unfortunately, it is far too toasty to be a good candidate for carbon based life habitation. It is probably one of the best earthlike exoplanets near enough to study its atmosphere - which will be interesting enough in itself. I would expect it to be venus like, if it has a significant atmosphere- which appears likely.
     
  4. Nov 12, 2015 #3

    DaveC426913

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    Yes. It's mostly going to be interesting because they may be able to study its atmo.
     
  5. Nov 13, 2015 #4
    Don't underestimate planets. If the planet has low levels of green house gases and harbors a sub surface ocean, it could potentially harbor some kind of life. Life on earth is known to be able to survive high water temperatures as well.

    I mean just consider our own solar system; moons like Europa, Titan, Enceladus, etc and even the planet Mars are all believed to possibly have life on them right now. Mars is believed to occasionally have liquid water on its surface and the sub surface lakes on oceans of the moons listed above are thought to be possible places for life to exist, especially Enceladus and Europa. Basically the point is that unexpected planets can offer surprising possibilities for life.
     
  6. Nov 14, 2015 #5

    Chronos

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    At a radiation level 19 times that of earth, surface water is highly unlikely.
     
  7. Nov 14, 2015 #6
    Hence im suggesting sub surface water like Europa or Enceladus or Titan or the underground aquifers of earth. Bacteria could exist in sub surface water aquifers at the poles or something--where its just cool enough to allow a kind of high temperature bacterium to survive.
     
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