Non-leptonic hadron decays: preferred paths?

In summary, my background of some introductory courses in particle physics has left me with severe shortcomings. I am guessing that there is a preference for processes that do not change the flavour of the hadrons, and that this preference is based on the strength of the corresponding interactions. I am also guessing that this preference is based on the energy scale at which the coupling constant diverges. Thank you for your insight!
  • #1
terra
27
2
My background of some introductory courses in particle physics has left me with severe shortcomings.

Say we start from a hadron, which decays purely to other hadrons. My question is this: through which interaction does the process take place? Is there a preferred interaction, and why/why not?
Let me put my thoughts/guesses/current understanding here.
A process in which the flavour of one or more quarks in the original hadron changes, must happen through weak interaction, and there are no other options.
Processes in which the flavours don't change could happen either through strong, weak or electromagnetic interaction. Right? Now, my guess is that there is a preference. How should I see this exactly? I thought about comparing the coupling constants, but I've understood that the coupling constant of the strong force depends on the distance of the quarks. Then again, how far can I get the quarks from each other depends on the energy they have. So once I fix the energy scale, I would be able to compare the couplings? Or is there an easier approach? Or am I missing something?
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
terra said:
Processes in which the flavours don't change could happen either through strong, weak or electromagnetic interaction. Right?
Right.

terra said:
I thought about comparing the coupling constants, but I've understood that the coupling constant of the strong force depends on the distance of the quarks.
It depends on energy, but binding energies in hadrons are always at the QCD energy scale. "Distance of quarks" is not a meaningful concept in hadrons.
The strong interaction is so strong that it nearly always dominates.
The electromagnetic interaction is significantly weaker.
The weak interaction is negligible if one of the two other interactions is available.

Only in rare cases like the J/Psi the strong interactions gets suppressed enough to see electromagnetic decays.
 
  • Like
Likes terra
  • #3
mfb said:
It depends on energy, but binding energies in hadrons are always at the QCD energy scale. "Distance of quarks" is not a meaningful concept in hadrons.
The strong interaction is so strong that it nearly always dominates.
The electromagnetic interaction is significantly weaker.
The weak interaction is negligible if one of the two other interactions is available.

Only in rare cases like the J/Psi the strong interactions gets suppressed enough to see electromagnetic decays.
I see, thank you for your insight. I take that by the qcd scale you mean the scale at which the coupling constant diverges, and as such perturbation theory can't be used.
 
Last edited:
  • #4
There is a parameter called QCD scale, it is important for hadron binding energies.
 

Related to Non-leptonic hadron decays: preferred paths?

1. What are non-leptonic hadron decays?

Non-leptonic hadron decays are a type of particle decay process in which a hadron (a composite particle made up of quarks) breaks down into other particles without the involvement of any leptons (such as electrons or neutrinos).

2. What is the preferred path in non-leptonic hadron decays?

The preferred path in non-leptonic hadron decays refers to the most common or most likely way in which a hadron will decay into other particles. This can be determined through experimental observations and theoretical calculations.

3. How do scientists study non-leptonic hadron decays?

Scientists study non-leptonic hadron decays through a combination of experimental methods and theoretical models. Experiments are conducted using particle accelerators to create and observe hadrons, while theoretical models help to understand and predict the behavior of these particles.

4. What are the implications of studying non-leptonic hadron decays?

Studying non-leptonic hadron decays can provide valuable insights into the fundamental nature of matter and the strong nuclear force that governs the behavior of quarks within hadrons. It can also help to test and refine our understanding of the Standard Model of particle physics.

5. Are there any real-world applications of studying non-leptonic hadron decays?

While the study of non-leptonic hadron decays is primarily focused on fundamental physics research, some potential real-world applications include the development of new medical imaging techniques and the production of new materials with unique properties.

Similar threads

  • High Energy, Nuclear, Particle Physics
Replies
7
Views
1K
  • High Energy, Nuclear, Particle Physics
Replies
6
Views
2K
  • High Energy, Nuclear, Particle Physics
Replies
30
Views
2K
  • High Energy, Nuclear, Particle Physics
Replies
10
Views
604
  • High Energy, Nuclear, Particle Physics
Replies
4
Views
2K
  • High Energy, Nuclear, Particle Physics
Replies
4
Views
1K
  • High Energy, Nuclear, Particle Physics
Replies
4
Views
2K
  • High Energy, Nuclear, Particle Physics
Replies
3
Views
1K
  • High Energy, Nuclear, Particle Physics
Replies
6
Views
4K
  • High Energy, Nuclear, Particle Physics
Replies
4
Views
1K
Back
Top