Non-trivial field limits' equivalence?

3,073
3
What is the field F(r) with the least symmetry and which obeys

lim F(r) as r --> oo = lim F(r) as r --> 0

?
 

Hurkyl

Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
Gold Member
14,845
17
What sort of symmetry? In what way are you quantifying it?
 
3,073
3
I thought that the putative field may have a minimal symmetry where r is of constant magnitude and isotropic in direction, but that there might be a fractal field of lesser symmetry that obeys the given conditions. Permit me a modification:

"What is the field F(r) with the least symmetry and which obeys

lim F(r) as r --> oo = lim F(r) as r --> 0

?"
 

Hurkyl

Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
Gold Member
14,845
17
What sort of symmetry? In what way are you quantifying the symmetry?
 

matt grime

Science Advisor
Homework Helper
9,394
3
What do 'constant magnitude', and 'isotropic in direction', or 'fractal fields' mean (in this context, or any context for the last two; isoptropic means 'equal in all directions, so how can anything be isotropic in direction?' )?
 
3,073
3
Hurkyl,

What sort of symmetry? In what way are you quantifying the symmetry?
Geometric symmetry. I am quantifying the symmetry as a (metric) space.

Matt Grime,

What do 'constant magnitude', and 'isotropic in direction', or 'fractal fields' mean (in this context, or any context for the last two; isoptropic means 'equal in all directions, so how can anything be isotropic in direction?' )?
"Constant magnitude" (which is incorrect; r is variable) and "isotropic in direction" (which is redundant) refer to the radius vector r correctly being "isotropic at every point." By "fractal field" I speculate that the embedded field as defined may not fill the original space at every point.
 

matt grime

Science Advisor
Homework Helper
9,394
3
Yep, that still makes no sense.

How are you defining 'symmetry of a field' to be a vector space? What is a symmetry of a field? (I am asking for your definition, since I don't know that you're using symmetry to mean an automorphism Given your non-standard usage of terms I am assuming not.) How are they, whatever they are, metrized?

It appears r is a vector. You've not said in what vector space? What does it mean for a 'field' to be embedded in a vector space? What is the definition of 'fill' that you're using.

All these questions, and probably more, mean we have no idea what you're talking about.
 
Last edited:
3,073
3
Thank you for your patience.

Consider a one-dimensional space. Apply the constraint that the assigned value at any point equals the value at a distance from the point approaching infinity. What distribution, with greater complexity than where all values are constant and equal, obeys the constraint? Might a "class" of fractal distributions meet this condition?
 

matt grime

Science Advisor
Homework Helper
9,394
3
You really are not making any sense what-so-ever. Do you understand what a field is? Do you understand that a field does not have a point called infinity, and very few fields have any notion of distance at all? Are you going to answer any of the questions I asked or should I assume I'm wasting my time? I know what answer I'm leaning towards on that one.
 
Last edited:
3,073
3
I'm sorry if I'm wasting your time. Apparently I am not as mathematiclly literate as I thought I was. You are right that a field does not have "a point called infinity," a major weakness in my argument. Allow me to retreat and possibly present my repaired premise in the future.
 

Related Threads for: Non-trivial field limits' equivalence?

  • Last Post
Replies
7
Views
4K
  • Last Post
Replies
2
Views
5K
Replies
8
Views
1K
  • Last Post
Replies
8
Views
2K
  • Last Post
Replies
3
Views
1K
Replies
8
Views
6K
  • Last Post
Replies
3
Views
7K
  • Last Post
Replies
6
Views
2K

Hot Threads

Top