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Not exactly sure if this is the right subsectionI need to make

  1. Jun 6, 2010 #1
    not exactly sure if this is the right subsection

    I need to make something that generates AC power (an alternator) for a science project. The reason for this is that I need to control the voltage and the frequency. Is there anything in particular that I need to know?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 6, 2010 #2

    dlgoff

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    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 25, 2017
  4. Jun 6, 2010 #3
    Re: Zap

    Can I call you y?
     
  5. Jun 7, 2010 #4
    Re: Zap

    Would it be feasible for me to build one that's capable of creating arcs?
     
  6. Jun 7, 2010 #5
    Re: Zap

    You need a high voltage transformer for that. You can't, generally speaking, make an alternator that puts out that high of a voltage.

    Are you making a "Jacob's Ladder"?
     
  7. Jun 7, 2010 #6
    Re: Zap

    :rofl:

    good one!
     
  8. Jun 7, 2010 #7

    dlgoff

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    Re: Zap

    The frequency would be controlled by the speed (rpm) of the generator and the voltage from the generator can be controlled by the winding ratio of a transformer connected to it.

    If you want to create an arc that demonstrate you are generating power, then you could a neon sign transformer (7000 to 9000 volt secondary with a 110 volt primary) connected to a "Jacob's Ladder" as zoobyshoe mentioned. But I would suggest using a voltmeter connected directly to your generator. If your project is for a science project, you need to be safe and the voltmeter shows you know a little about instrumentation.

    How are you planning to turning your generator? Maybe a hand crank?
     
  9. Jun 7, 2010 #8
    Re: Zap

    unless you can make do with something like an electrostatic flame starter that you purchase off the shelf, high voltage is probably not appropriate for a science project. they wouldn't even let us use HV in electrical engineering senior design projects. it's something best left to those who specialize in it.
     
  10. Jun 7, 2010 #9

    dlgoff

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    Re: Zap

    Thanks Photon Soup. That's the best advice.
     
  11. Jun 8, 2010 #10
    Re: Zap

    Thanks for all the replies.

    I was reading some of Tesla's writings and wondered if I could do something similar.
     
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