Induction heater using Bicycle Dynamo Generator @ 24 V 60HZ Supply

In summary, an adult of good fitness can generate 100 W of power cycling at 50-60 Hz, which is enough to power an induction heating system. However, induction heating at 50-60 Hz is not a viable option due to the low power output.
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I was wondering about the possibility of Induction heater powered by Bicycle Dynamo (alternator/generator) without using any other circuit element. Which means connecting 24 V 50 to 60 HZ AC to Coil with turns around 100 in pancake shape (10 inch diameter ) and Stainless steel plate of 3 mm thickness on coil.

Would this setup work? If not, what needs to be done? More voltage? I want to run it on frequency in between 50-60 Hz only and want to have simplest circuit, so anyone in remote places can have something to heat or cook.
 
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  • #2
KuriousKid said:
Would this setup work? If not, what needs to be done? More voltage? I want to run it on frequency in between 50-60 Hz only and want to have simplest circuit, so anyone in remote places can have something to heat or cook.
How many people do you want have pedaling as you cook?

Before focusing too much on the design details of your bike dynamo/induction heater, ponder a back-of-the envelope estimate of the energy that goes into cooking. Per this site, a rural family of 4 can expect to consume about 1.2 kWh per day using induction heat to cook traditional dishes. Assuming 3 meals, that's an average 0.4 kWh per meal. Now Wikipedia states that for bicycling "An adult of good fitness is more likely to average between 50 and 150 watts for an hour of vigorous exercise." So let's split the difference and call it 100 W per cyclist and generously grant your device 100% efficient conversion of human to electrical power. That's still four fit adults pedaling 1 hour to cook one meal and eight to finish cooking in 1/2 hour.

A family of 4 just doesn't have enough people to (vigorously) power the induction heating and actually cook 3 meals a day in any reasonable amount of time.
 
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  • #3
Toaster needs less power than the induction heater.



Besides: I have a feeling just like in your previous thread, you are treating the coil as if it was just a resistive heater. It is not, induction heater working principle is quite different. Power requirements are similar though.
 
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  • #4
renormalize said:
"An adult of good fitness is more likely to average between 50 and 150 watts for an hour of vigorous exercise."
To make that more visual, that's around the 'cooking power' of one or two candles.
 
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  • #5
renormalize said:
How many people do you want have pedaling as you cook?

Before focusing too much on the design details of your bike dynamo/induction heater, ponder a back-of-the envelope estimate of the energy that goes into cooking. Per this site, a rural family of 4 can expect to consume about 1.2 kWh per day using induction heat to cook traditional dishes. Assuming 3 meals, that's an average 0.4 kWh per meal. Now Wikipedia states that for bicycling "An adult of good fitness is more likely to average between 50 and 150 watts for an hour of vigorous exercise." So let's split the difference and call it 100 W per cyclist and generously grant your device 100% efficient conversion of human to electrical power. That's still four fit adults pedaling 1 hour to cook one meal and eight to finish cooking in 1/2 hour.

A family of 4 just doesn't have enough people to (vigorously) power the induction heating and actually cook 3 meals a day in any reasonable amount of time.
I think I should have mentioned that the Generator is not driven by human but other renewable energy sources. It could be Wind mill, or Water stream or something similar, so Actual Human being is not involved. Took Bicycle Generator as example as everybody knows about it.

But for sake of clarity and convenience, assume that the Generator does generate 24 V @ 60 hz and there is no issue about capability of it.

My goal is to understand the Induction heater and it's simplest design possibility without adding much of external components.
 
  • #6
Induction heating just won't work well at 60Hz. So, you are really just describing a generic power source for the electronics that will convert it to a suitable high power and high frequency to drive the inductive coil. Sorry, it's not simple.

Read this wikipedia entry and ask us if you have specific questions. However, I strongly suspect you will need to learn more about physics/electronics to appreciate how this really works.
 
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  • #7
DaveE said:
Induction heating just won't work well at 60Hz.
Indeed, induction stoves operate in the 25-50 kHz range for a good reason. For example, http://10.3390/en12152915 design study of a 3.2 kW induction cooking system depicts the following:
energies-12-02915-g005.png

Note that the power delivered to various pots is maximized at or above 20 kHz. In contrast, only negligible power is available below 1 kHz.

Induction cooking at 50-60 Hz is a nonstarter.
 
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  • #8
KuriousKid said:
But for sake of clarity and convenience, assume that the Generator does generate 24 V @ 60 hz and there is no issue about capability of it.
Voltage isn't power. Google tells me a stock bicycle generator is not enough on it's own. You'd need storage too.
 
  • #9
renormalize said:
Indeed, induction stoves operate in the 25-50 kHz range for a good reason. For example, http://10.3390/en12152915 design study of a 3.2 kW induction cooking system depicts the following:
View attachment 320546
Note that the power delivered to various pots is maximized at or above 20 kHz. In contrast, only negligible power is available below 1 kHz.

Induction cooking at 50-60 Hz is a nonstarter.
So resistive type, Nichrome or similar heating element is only option at this frequency?
 
  • #10
KuriousKid said:
So resistive type, Nichrome or similar heating element is only option at this frequency?
The fact that you need to ask this speaks volumes. As I have implied to you in a previous thread concerning inductive heating, yes.
 
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  • #11
Since you've shown a lot in interest in electrical stuff, I suggest you study the basic of electricity a bit. Khan Academy has some really good tutorials about basic physics and electronics. Your posts tend to be in the "trying to run before you can walk" category. Most of the really interesting electronic stuff you see in everyday modern life requires that you learn some fundamental knowledge first before you can really understand it. That stuff was designed by engineers who nearly all have at least a BS in the physical sciences. We're trying to save you some disappointment here; think/learn first, build it later. Guessing at solutions or throwing something together rarely works with electronics.
 
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