Perfectly inelastic collision and inelastic collision

In summary, the two gliders moving towards each other on a frictionless linear air track have masses of 0.5kg and 0.3kg and initial velocities of 2m/s to the left and right, respectively. After the collision, glider 2 moves away to the left with a final velocity of 2m/s. This does not support the concept of a perfectly inelastic collision, as stated by Wikipedia, and suggests a loss of kinetic energy rather than coalescence.
  • #1
Kurokari
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0

Homework Statement



Two gliders move toward each other on a frictionless linear air track.

Glider 1, mass = 0.5kg , velocity = 2m/s (to the left)
Glider 2, mass = 0.3kg , velocity = 2m/s (to the right)

After collision, glider 2 moves away (to the left) with final velocity of 2m/s.

___________________________________________________________________

The question I want to ask is that, I read up on wikipedia, saying perfectly inelastic collision will result in the two objects sticking together and moving with a same final velocity.

However in this question, I found out the final velocity for glider 1 to be v = -0.4m/s, which doesn't support what Wikipedia has since glider 2 moves to the left with 2 m/s. So I'm thinking maybe the question given is NOT a perfectly inelastic collision, can anyone clear my doubts about this?

Homework Equations



m1v1 + m2v2 = m1u1 + m2u2


The Attempt at a Solution



substituting masses and velocities into the above equations will get me v1 = -0.4 m/s
 
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  • #2
Hi,
The question directly states, if I understand you correctly that,
After collision, glider 2 moves away (to the left) with final velocity of 2m/s.
Which implies that, once one of them has started to move separately, you can no longer consider it as a "perfectly" inelastic interaction between them. Rather, there could be a loss of kinetic energy due to other factors, but not such that would prompt them to coalesce.
I hope that helps,
Daniel
 
  • #3
Collision is not perfectly inelastic.
 

Related to Perfectly inelastic collision and inelastic collision

What is a perfectly inelastic collision?

A perfectly inelastic collision is a type of collision in which two objects collide and stick together, resulting in a loss of kinetic energy. In this type of collision, the objects become deformed and the final velocity of the objects is the same.

What is an inelastic collision?

An inelastic collision is a type of collision in which the objects involved do not stick together, but some of the kinetic energy is lost due to the deformation of the objects or the conversion of kinetic energy into other forms of energy, such as heat or sound.

What is the difference between a perfectly inelastic collision and an inelastic collision?

The main difference between a perfectly inelastic collision and an inelastic collision is the amount of kinetic energy lost. In a perfectly inelastic collision, all of the kinetic energy is lost, while in an inelastic collision, only some of the kinetic energy is lost.

What are some real-life examples of perfectly inelastic collisions?

Some real-life examples of perfectly inelastic collisions include a car crashing into a wall, a bullet hitting a target and getting embedded in it, and two clay balls colliding and sticking together.

How are perfectly inelastic collisions and inelastic collisions used in the field of physics?

Perfectly inelastic collisions and inelastic collisions are important concepts in the field of physics, as they help us understand the conservation of momentum and the transfer of kinetic energy in collisions. They are also used in engineering and in studying the behavior of materials under high impact forces.

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