Photons associated with magnetic force

In summary, the conversation discusses the force carrier for the electromagnetic force, which is the photon in Quantum Electrodynamics (QED). However, in the case of magnets, the photons involved are "virtual" and do not physically appear in electrostatics or magnetostatics. It is also mentioned that classical electromagnetism can explain how magnets work and that QED reduces to Maxwell's EM in the classical limit. The speaker encourages the other person to perform their own calculations to fully understand these concepts.
  • #1
yangonite
1
0
Hi guys

First of all apologies if my question appears naive or simplistic - new to this field.

I have read that the force carrier for the electromagnetic force is the photon. So I bring the same poles of two magnets together and feel the repulsive force thus produced. I am unaware of any photons associated with this interaction. Can someone explain this.

thanks
 
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  • #2
Hi, and welcome to PF

I'm sure you can find lots of discussions about this already here if you browse. In addition many people will be more qualified than me to explain you. The advice I would give you is to try to make actual calculations by yourself. This business is not trivial.

You may first try to read this
 
  • #3
The photons that are used in Quantum Electrodynamics (QED) to derive static force laws are "virtual" and do not appear physically in electrostatics or magnetostatics.
 
  • #4
yango - we truly have no idea how a magnet works, if that is what you are asking. we do not know what a field is, in practical terms, any more than we know how gravity operates. i posted a question here about how a magnet works a few years ago, just to stir people up - you can read what others had to say here:
https://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=19919&highlight=jnorman
 
  • #5
jnorman said:
yango - we truly have no idea how a magnet works, if that is what you are asking. we do not know what a field is, in practical terms, any more than we know how gravity operates. i posted a question here about how a magnet works a few years ago, just to stir people up - you can read what others had to say here:
https://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=19919&highlight=jnorman

We do know how magnets work from classical electromagnetism, and we do know that QED reduces to Maxwell's EM in the classical limit. From the other discussion, it simply seems that nobody took time to tell you that. It is a mathematically proven fact in principle, and as simply explained by John Baez in the link posted above, we can make explicit calculations, even though they turn out hairy, they are very instructive.

Additionnaly, we can calculate Einstein's equation from the assumption of massless spin-2 boson exchange, an approach Feynman decided to take in his lectures on gravitation. Even more can be made, like calculating explicit metrics from graviton exchange, but here is not the place to discuss this.

Once again, it is just a matter of performing the calculations by yourself if you want to understand and be convinced. All the rest is just words.
 

What are photons?

Photons are particles of light that make up electromagnetic radiation. They have no mass and travel at the speed of light.

How are photons associated with magnetic force?

Photons are associated with magnetic force because they have an electric field component that can interact with charged particles, such as electrons. When photons interact with electrons, they can create a magnetic field.

What is the relationship between photons and magnets?

The relationship between photons and magnets is that photons are the carriers of electromagnetic force, and magnets are objects that create a magnetic field. Without photons, there would be no magnetic force.

Can photons be affected by magnetic fields?

Yes, photons can be affected by magnetic fields. This is because photons have an electric field component that can interact with the charged particles in a magnetic field, causing the photon's path to bend.

How do photons interact with matter?

Photons interact with matter in several ways, including absorption, scattering, and emission. When a photon is absorbed by matter, it transfers its energy to the matter. When it is scattered, it changes direction. And when it is emitted, it creates a new photon with the same energy and frequency.

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