Physics vs Computer Engineering Job Market: Which is Best?

In summary: For a physics or EE degree, it is more likely that you will be able to find a job as a result of having a double major. However, if you only want a job in one field, then a degree in engineering would be the better choice. - If you only want a job in one field, then a degree in engineering would be the better choice. However, if you are prepared to stay in school for a long time, then a double major in physics and engineering is an option.
  • #1
bassplayer142
432
0
I have always been leaning towards computer engineering till now. Now I feel that physics would be more exciting and would open more doors. How is the job market of physics vs computer engineering. I plan to do a double major and now I'm thinking it might be electrical engineering. Would a physics and ee degree be the way to go? I'm looking for answers strictly on a job basis. Like which has more jobs and which is more flexible to careers that are parallel. I don't need guidance on what I find interesting anymore. Thanks.
 
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  • #2
Well, engineering seems to be the most insured route to go. You can browse through the earlier threads and see that there are a decent number of recently graduated people with no job because selling your physicists degree tend to take more effort than selling an engineering degree.

If you want a job right after a b.s. engineering is probably the easiest of the two and ee or ce will provide you with a good number of choices.
 
  • #3
I was thinking I would take EE first since I have to make that switch from CE. I think I'm really lucky because it seems that all classes will transfer over since both fields are so close. Then I guess I got a few years to decide what next. Thanks
 
  • #4
bassplayer142 said:
I have always been leaning towards computer engineering till now. Now I feel that physics would be more exciting and would open more doors. How is the job market of physics vs computer engineering. I plan to do a double major and now I'm thinking it might be electrical engineering. Would a physics and ee degree be the way to go? I'm looking for answers strictly on a job basis. Like which has more jobs and which is more flexible to careers that are parallel. I don't need guidance on what I find interesting anymore. Thanks.

With just a BS in Physics, you are less likely to find a job as compared with just a BS in engineering.

However, with a double major in Physics and EE, or EE and CE, then it's a different story. They are probably more equally likely than one would think.

CS
 
  • #5
Double major in physics and engineering is hell. Unless you're prepared to stay in school for a long time, that is.
 
  • #6
How long is a long time exactly? I just love to learn and I want a great job that is exciting and pays well. Also, to have job security.
 
  • #7
Well how many classes are you prepared to take per semester in order to fulfill the double major requirements? If you're thinking the standard 4-5 classes, you're definitely going to have to stay in school for a year or 2 longer than a standard single degree course. If you're taking more like 7-8, then the question is, are you able to cope with the workload?
 
  • #8
1) Very few people with a BS in Physics are able to find jobs in physics.
2) Virtually all people with a BS in either CpE or EE are able to find good jobs in those fields.
3) EE and CpE are so similar that there is no point in double majoring in them.
4) A double major in physics will not help you find a job in CpE or EE.
5) The only sensible reason to study physics is for love of the subject.
6) Physics does not pay nearly as well as engineering.
7) Engineering provides much greater job security than does physics, at least at the BS level.

- Warren
 

Related to Physics vs Computer Engineering Job Market: Which is Best?

1. What is the current demand for physics and computer engineering jobs?

The demand for both physics and computer engineering jobs is high, but the demand for computer engineering jobs is currently higher. This is due to the increasing use of technology in various industries and the growing demand for professionals with computer engineering skills.

2. Which field offers better salary opportunities?

In general, computer engineering jobs tend to offer higher salaries compared to physics jobs. However, this can vary depending on the specific job role, experience, and location.

3. Are the job growth prospects better for physics or computer engineering?

The job growth prospects for computer engineering are currently better than those for physics. This is because computer engineering is a rapidly evolving field with a high demand for skilled professionals in various industries.

4. Is a degree in physics or computer engineering more valuable in the job market?

Both degrees are valuable in the job market, as they provide different skills and knowledge. A degree in physics may be more valuable for research-based roles, while a degree in computer engineering may be more valuable for industry-based roles.

5. What are the key differences between the physics and computer engineering job markets?

The key differences between the physics and computer engineering job markets include the types of industries and job roles available. Physics jobs may be more focused on research and academia, while computer engineering jobs may have a broader range of opportunities in industries such as technology, healthcare, and finance.

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