Plot Intrinsic Equations Free with KmPLot and Maxima

  • Thread starter Fermat
  • Start date
In summary, the conversation is about finding a program or application to plot intrinsic equations, preferably for free. Suggestions for KmPlot and Maxima have been made, but they do not seem to be able to plot intrinsic equations. Someone suggests using Origin, which is not free but is considered the best for this purpose. The person asking the question has downloaded the evaluation copy but cannot find any information on plotting intrinsic equations in the help files. They are then given instructions on how to plot the intrinsic equation for a parabola in Origin, and are directed to the Origin forum for further help. The conversation ends with a clarification on what an intrinsic equation is and the person still struggling to plot it in Origin.
  • #1
Fermat
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Anyone know of a program/application/applet that will plot/graph intrinsic equations ?
(preferably free)

I've already had suggestions for KmPLot and Maxima, but neither, it seems, can do the job.
KmPLot is mainly for Linux and I'm on Win XP. (also Vista)
 
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  • #2
Try Origin, it's the best for this. But it is not free.
 
  • #3
Thanks. I've downloaded the evaluation copy. But I can't find any reference to "intrinsic" in the help files.. There's nothing in the plot menu about intrinsic equations either.

The intrinsic equaion for the parabola is,

s = a tan(psi) sec(psi) + a log(tan(psi)+sec(psi)).

How would I use Origin to plot this?

TIA
 
  • #4
create new graph
go to menu Graph/add function graph/then copy-paste your equations, or use the drop down menu to choose elementary functions to combine them into your formula.

And they have an excellent forum there http://www.originlab.com/forum/default.asp
 
  • #5
Thanks for the input Trebmling, but I'm wondering if we have been talking at cross purposes.

An intrinsic equation, of the form s=f(psi), passes through the origin. s is the distance along the curve from the origin to a point of interest and psi (or tan(psi)) is the slope of the curve at the point of interest. (In other words, s and psi are not rectangular/Cartesian coordinates, or polar coordinates.)

I've been to the Origin forum and posted my query there - "how do I use Origin to plot an intrinsic equation?" - using the above description of an intrinsic eqn. I've had no responses.

I can go into Origin, create a new graph, and give a function, which will be F(x)=cos(x), say - a Cartesian equn. I can tell Origin to treat this as a polar eqn. But can I tell Origin to treat it as an intrinsic equation?

This is what I still can't get.
 

Related to Plot Intrinsic Equations Free with KmPLot and Maxima

1. What is KmPlot?

KmPlot is a free, open-source graphing calculator and plotting program that allows users to plot functions, parametric equations, and data sets in 2D and 3D.

2. What is Maxima?

Maxima is a free, open-source computer algebra system that is used for symbolic mathematical calculations. It can perform operations such as differentiation, integration, and solving equations.

3. How do I plot intrinsic equations with KmPlot and Maxima?

To plot intrinsic equations using KmPlot and Maxima, you will first need to enter the equations into Maxima using its syntax. Then, you can use the "plot2d" or "plot3d" command to plot the equations in KmPlot.

4. Can KmPlot and Maxima be used on any operating system?

Yes, both KmPlot and Maxima are cross-platform programs and can be used on Windows, Mac, and Linux operating systems.

5. Are there any limitations to plotting intrinsic equations with KmPlot and Maxima?

While KmPlot and Maxima are powerful tools for plotting equations, there may be some limitations depending on the complexity of the equations. Users may need to adjust the settings or use additional commands to accurately plot more complicated equations.

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