Positron movement in a coil-induced magnetic field

In summary, in a microscopy class, the problem is to illustrate the path of a positron on both sides of the axis in a coil produced magnetic field. Consider both cases of the particle's velocity and the magnetic field being in the same direction or in opposite directions.
  • #1
wgas
3
0
in a microscopy class:
problem is to illustrate the path of a positron on both sides of the axis in a coil produced magnetic field. consider both cases of the particle's velocity and the magnetic field being a)in the same direction & b)in opposite directions.

i have no clue. any help? would it just be the opposite of an electron's path?
 
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  • #2
Do you know anything about the electron path? You should write something about that, at least.
 
  • #3
see attached pic.

where A & B are condenser lenses in an EM, so they are fields generated by a coil.
A) the field & the velocity are the same direction
B) they are opposite
(both only shown on one side of the axis).

is this correct , with the electron in blue & the positron in red?
 

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  • #4
As far as I understand from your diagram, the dotted line represents the axis of the coil, and the e-/p+ is traveling in a st line inside the coil. Just outside the coil the magnetic field has started to diverge away from the axis, and you have drawn the instantaneous force on the e-/p+. The path of the particle inside the coil is above the axis.

In fig A, the B would point slightly upward and remain in the plane of the paper just outside the coil. For a +ve q, the force would be only out of the paper toward you, with no “down” component. Remember, these are just the instantaneous forces on the particles when the field lines are not parallel any more, not the trajectories. After an instant, there will be a “down” component to the force, but I’m not very sure how the full path is going to be. I have to read up on electron microscopes.

The same goes for fig B. The “out” and “in” are correct.
 
  • #5
ah. thanks for the help.
 

Related to Positron movement in a coil-induced magnetic field

What is a positron?

A positron is a subatomic particle with the same mass as an electron but with a positive charge. It is often referred to as the antiparticle of an electron.

How does a coil-induced magnetic field affect positron movement?

A coil-induced magnetic field can cause a positron to experience a force and change its direction of movement. This is due to the interaction between the positron's positive charge and the magnetic field.

What is the relationship between the strength of the magnetic field and positron movement?

The strength of the magnetic field directly affects the force experienced by the positron. A stronger magnetic field will result in a greater force and therefore a greater change in the positron's movement.

Can a positron be trapped in a coil-induced magnetic field?

Yes, a positron can be trapped in a coil-induced magnetic field. This is known as magnetic confinement and is used in particle accelerators and other scientific experiments.

What are the practical applications of studying positron movement in a coil-induced magnetic field?

Studying positron movement in a coil-induced magnetic field can help researchers better understand the behavior of subatomic particles and the principles of electromagnetism. This knowledge can have applications in fields such as particle physics, medical imaging, and magnetic levitation technology.

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