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Possible Physics masters somewhere down the line

  1. Dec 31, 2014 #1
    Hello everyone, this is my first post of this forum and I am looking for some advice. I'm sure threads like these are posted all the time and I'm sorry to clog up the forum more but I would just appreciate some opinions. I'm currently a double major in mathematics and philosophy with a minor in physics. I'm just curious if my minor in physics might allow me to apply to a masters program in physics later down the line. The classes I will take to complete my minor will be analytical mechanics, thermodynamics, quantum mechanics, and modern physics. I would almost be a physics major if I took electricity, magnetism, and waves as well but I couldn't fit it into my schedule. I'm really not sure what I want to do after I finish my undergraduate degrees. I just want to learn more about our world. I feel like I could pursue my goal with any of my fields of study, whether it be philosophy, math, or physics. It just comes down to what I am most interested in and what I feel will best allow me to accomplish my goal. Anyways, long story short, will my physics minor allow me to pursue physics at a higher level if I were to want to follow this avenue further? Thank you for any advice, I appreciate it.
     
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  3. Jan 1, 2015 #2

    ShayanJ

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    Knowing Electromagnetism well is a very big must for physics students. If you become a physics graduate student, everyone will expect you to know it well. So if you want to become a physics graduate student, you should either take the available classes or learn it on your own. But I think its not that easy to learn it on your own. Given that you're ready to choose Math and Philosophy as well, you don't seem to be serious enough for undertaking this path. So somehow accommodate EM classes in your schedule.
     
  4. Jan 1, 2015 #3
    I'll be studying it on the side. It isn't really so much that I won't have knowledge of the subject, just that it won't show up officially on my transcript.
     
  5. Jan 1, 2015 #4

    ShayanJ

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    So learn it really well. But maybe people in your grad school don't like the fact that there is no EM among the classes you participated in. I really don't know about this part and give no comment. Other people who know more about US educational system(you're from US, right?) should give ideas.
     
  6. Jan 1, 2015 #5
    Yeah that's what I was thinking. I was thinking that if I took the GRE and did well they would see that I know the subject matter well. Anyways, the more I think about it the more I think I will most likely apply for a graduate program in mathematical physics through the math department. I'm not sure how much physics they are looking for in their applicants though.
     
  7. Jan 4, 2015 #6
    I'm in the same boat as you. The graduate advisor at my school told me that it is possible because of the classes I took that had extensive applications to physics like vector calculus, differential equations and mathematical modeling. For my physics minor I'm required to do Mechanics, EM, and Modern Physics. I also will be doing two upper level classes that are actually combined sections with the graduate equivalent. The requirements for the program I'm applying for has an oral interview to determine knowledge level and to determine if any prerequisites need to be met. I would talk to your physics department advisor, professors and even grad students to see what they think.
     
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