Predict Whether Collision will be Elastic or Inelastic

In summary, the conversation discusses a problem involving a mass on a spring and a car approaching it with a semi-rigid rubber tire. The question is whether the collision will be elastic or inelastic. Basic equations for both types of collisions are provided, but the solution cannot be determined from the given information. The collision cannot be elastic due to the presence of a spring force.
  • #1

Homework Statement


A mass sits on the end of a spring and is at equilibrium.
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|/\/\/\/\/|_m_|________________()' o_____o '_________________

A car is costing gracefully towards the mass. The car has a semi-rigid rubber tire mounted on its front. The mass of the mass and mass of the car are approximately equal mass. When the car collides with the mass will the collision be elastic or inelastic?

Homework Equations


There are basic equations for collision problems. In elastic collisions

m1*v1_i + m2*v2_i = m1*v1_final + m2*v2_final

In inelastic collisions

m1*v1_i + m2*v2_i = (m1+m2)*v_f

In both types of problems kinetic energy in conserved and

m1*v1_i^2 + m2*v2_i^2 = m1*v1_final^2 + m2*v2_final^2

The Attempt at a Solution


The problem is to determine what type of collision is at hand. As far as attempting a solution, I can't really go any farther than this.
 
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  • #2
The collision can't be elastic as due to the spring force, linear momentum along the x-axis is not conserved and that's a condition for elastic collisions.
 
  • #3


Based on the given information, it is difficult to definitively predict whether the collision will be elastic or inelastic. Both types of collisions can occur in this situation, depending on various factors such as the speed and angle of approach, the stiffness of the spring, and the materials involved.

In an elastic collision, the objects would bounce off each other with no loss of kinetic energy. This would require the spring to be very stiff and the car to approach the mass at a low speed.

In an inelastic collision, the objects would stick together and some kinetic energy would be lost, potentially due to the deformation of the spring or the rubber tire. This would be more likely if the car is approaching the mass at a higher speed and the spring and tire are less rigid.

Therefore, to make a more accurate prediction, additional information about the specific circumstances of the collision would be needed.
 

1. What is the difference between elastic and inelastic collisions?

In an elastic collision, the total kinetic energy of the system is conserved, meaning that the total energy before the collision is equal to the total energy after the collision. In an inelastic collision, some of the kinetic energy is lost and converted into other forms of energy, such as heat or sound.

2. How can I predict whether a collision will be elastic or inelastic?

To predict the type of collision, you need to know the initial kinetic energy of the objects involved, as well as any external forces acting on the system. If the total kinetic energy remains the same before and after the collision, it is elastic. If there is a decrease in total kinetic energy, it is inelastic.

3. What factors affect the type of collision?

The type of collision is affected by the nature of the objects involved, such as their mass, velocity, and elasticity. The presence of external forces, such as friction or air resistance, can also impact the type of collision.

4. Can a collision be both elastic and inelastic?

No, a collision can only be classified as either elastic or inelastic. However, some collisions may have characteristics of both types, such as a decrease in kinetic energy but no change in momentum.

5. Why is it important to know the type of collision?

Understanding the type of collision can help in predicting the outcome of an event, such as the paths of the objects after the collision and the amount of energy transferred. This information is crucial in many fields, including engineering, physics, and sports.

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