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Prisoners Taunting Victims via Facebook

  1. Nov 22, 2011 #1
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 22, 2011 #2

    rhody

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    Most know my opinion on this so I won't bore you with it again, I will simply say to keep from being victimized, exploited, possibly robbed, stalked, let's see... what other evils have I missed, delete your FB account and walk away. You will be a better person for having done so, and be safer too.

    Rhody... :grumpy:
     
  4. Nov 22, 2011 #3
    They don't. The article says their cell phones are smuggled in and confiscated when found.
     
  5. Nov 22, 2011 #4
    The women's rights movement experienced the same thing with battered women. Not only their ex would seek them out online, but every misogynist in the world would search online for vulnerable women to troll making it difficult to create online support groups. Their solution was to organize such groups consensually and rotate moderators among all the members. Give them the slightest excuse to boot you from the listserve or website and they will.
     
  6. Nov 22, 2011 #5

    FlexGunship

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    The whole point of prisons is to keep the malicious members away from the general population (I think). I hate Facebook with a passion, but people should feel relatively safe to use it (if not safe from the general public, then certainly safe from their past abusers who are in jail).
     
  7. Nov 22, 2011 #6

    rhody

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    I agree Flex, perhaps they should coin a new term for the person being victimized, using "virtually victimized" instead. Just because the person being harassed is not in the presense of the perpetrator, it does not mean they are not subject to any less stress in the form of taunts, threats, etc... that jailbird may inflict on them. The person being harassed can block them. However, because they will always feel threatened, they have to check the jailbird's postings periodically to see if they need to take further precautions in the event that he is released. A bad situation, only exacerbated by the ease at which threats can be made.

    Rhody...
     
  8. Nov 22, 2011 #7

    FlexGunship

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    Well, the solace of jail comes from knowing that the jailed individual can't interact with you. This seems to remove that solace. Further, it reminds you that they haven't forgotten you.
     
  9. Nov 22, 2011 #8
    I know that in certain states USA is more tough on this but in the uk omg they get luxury not only do they get access to computers and internet, some are given play stations and xbox's and one of our worst Rose West has her own private room with an en-suite bathroom and even can have pets
     
  10. Nov 22, 2011 #9
    They can always harass by mailing a letter or through their friends network.

    Unless someone was convicted for breaching internet related laws, I don't see why they shouldn't have "unfettered access" to the internet.


    As for providing entertainment to prisoners, be aware that there are multiple opinions/views on how the criminals should be treated and which approach would be most beneficial to the overall society. Many people argue that criminals should be given tough treatment based only on morality/emotions but to my knowledge I have never seen anyone coming up with a substantial evidence why that will be the best approach at hands.
     
    Last edited: Nov 22, 2011
  11. Nov 22, 2011 #10

    Ryan_m_b

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    And what newspaper did you swallow that from? I have no doubt that there are prisons in the country that have recreation rooms with things like this but it's hardly fair or accurate to portray prison as some sort of hotel. Some prisons are pretty awful places full of awful people, others are full of petty criminals which can potentially be turned into functioning members of society through counselling, training etc. The last thing anyone wants is high recidivist rates.
    There are other purposes;

    1) To give a sense of satisfaction to society that a criminal is receiving a punishment

    2) To prevent inmates committing crime in future

    3) To act as a deterrent to would-be criminals

    I've yet to see a prison that can satisfy all of these criteria. Often a prison that aims to fulfil option 2 often get's a reputation (perhaps unfairly) for failing at 1 and 3. A prison that succeeds in accomplishing 1 can be pretty rubbish at 2 etc
     
  12. Nov 22, 2011 #11
    Well ok let me re-phrase; a lot of prisoners who are considered to have behaved properly get rewarded with such luxury and all this also depends on classification. Rose west in in Broadmoor where we put those who are deemed to be too dangerous to ever be released and are mainly the psychopaths and sociopaths, however a lot of funding goes their way and for good behaviour they get a lot of perks. It is true that here we are not as tough as some think on prisoners and a bill is currently underway for them to be able to vote, i am not referring to fraud criminals here I'm talking about murderers and rapists
     
  13. Nov 22, 2011 #12
    I am strongly against the idea of removing prisoners (including murderers and rapists) from the workforce. We should let them work inside prisons, give them training if they need. They earn income and buy any kind of entertainment they wish.

    Letting them sit idly and giving them luxurious treatment is wrong. But, I don't see much wrong with letting them have a luxurious life inside prisons as far they can afford it.
     
  14. Nov 22, 2011 #13
    This is a great idea. I would much rather my job were taken from me by an illegal American than an illegal alien.
     
  15. Nov 22, 2011 #14
    we already have the prison plantations. only they don't so much get the luxury life. this is made possible by slavery as punishment for crime being written into the 13th Amendment to the US Constitution. slavery never went away, we just have to catch you with crack, first.
     
  16. Nov 22, 2011 #15

    Ryan_m_b

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    I don't mean to nit pick but both of those things are medical disorders. People diagnosed with them require medical attention, the majority of the time in a secure facility. It's not the same as someone of a healthy condition who chooses to perform a malicious act.
     
  17. Nov 22, 2011 #16
    Well its debatable there pretty much no treatment over here for that apart from locking them up, and many would say that rapists have a disorder however many also believe that there is no such disorder just a want to cause pain and suffering and control.

    All meant was the uk in its efforts to try and seem respectful of everyones rights go too far at times and prison is not always as hard here as it seems. We so not have first and second degree murder so life terms don't actually mean life many get out after 8 years
     
  18. Nov 22, 2011 #17

    Evo

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    I've posted links before, here in the US, prison inmates can and do work for private companies and they earn wages.

    The companies build workshops inside the prisons and *hire* inmates. A lot of clothing that you see "made in USA" labels on are "made in prisons".
     
  19. Nov 22, 2011 #18
    Thanks!

    I found two links,

    http://motherjones.com/politics/2008/07/what-do-prisoners-make-victorias-secret

    http://oce.oregon.gov/products/112 [Broken]

    Quite interesting, I never came across these links before. I had been aware of training prisoners but wasn't aware that they can earn wages.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 5, 2017
  20. Nov 22, 2011 #19

    AlephZero

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    To be pedantic, Broadmoor is not a prison, it is a high security psychiatric hospital. Some of the patients are not legally guilty of any crime, since they were assessed as mentallly unfit to plead and stand trial.
     
  21. Nov 22, 2011 #20

    AlephZero

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    Absolutely. I mean, you wouldn't want to stop them talking to their fellow criminals outside, would you? It stands to reason that when they get released they need to integrate back into their own society as quickly as possible. [/IRONY]
     
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