Publishing a Result: Rules of Thumb

  • Thread starter center o bass
  • Start date
In summary, when deciding when to publish a result, it is important to consider various factors such as the novelty of the result, the specific field and journal in which it will be published, and the opinions of one's supervisor and colleagues. It is also crucial to thoroughly research and ensure that the result is not already published by someone else. Ultimately, the decision should be made after careful consideration and discussion with those familiar with the field and publishing process.
  • #1
center o bass
560
2
Rules of thumb for when to publish a result.

Being novel to the game of academia I wonder if there are any rules of thumb to follow
when one should publish a result or not.

Suppose one finds a result which one suspects might be new. How should one then proceed?
Should one go about looking around carefully to see of someone else has done it? If so, how carefully should one look? What would qualify as a 'new' result anyway? Is it enough if the result comes with a new twist/perspective, or if one builds on an earlier result?
 
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  • #2
As a theoretical physicists, in which journals should one ideally wish to publish one's paper? Does it depend on the content of the paper? (If so, which journal should one wish to publish a result in gravity, quantum gravity and unified theories?) Can it count against you if you publish in one of the less recognized journals?
 
  • #3
As theoretical physicist, one should already have read dozens, if not hundreds, of papers already. One would expect that such physicist already are aware, based on the papers they read, the journals that these papers are published in and the different tiers and prestige that each journal has.

Zz.
 
  • #4
This depends on many factors, and is something you learn gradually if you work in a field. Basically, the rule-of-thumb is to submit the paper to a journal YOU read, you know your collegues/competitors read and that publish results in your field.

This is something best discussed with your supervisor.

Edit: ZZ was faster
 
  • #5
center o bass said:
Should one go about looking around carefully to see of someone else has done it?
If it is a purely theoretical result then yes, you should look very carefully. The last thing you want is for one of the referees to tell you that the result has already been published (this is one of the things a referee looks for). Experimental results also have to be at lest somewhat novel, but experiments are by their very nature rarely exact duplicates of work in other labs (we always get somewhat different results or use other methods).

What would qualify as a 'new' result anyway? Is it enough if the result comes with a new twist/perspective, or if one builds on an earlier result?

There are no clear rules and it depends on the journal. Journals with lower "prestige" often publish work that e.g. uses a new method to reach a known result, or perhaps is just another "version" of a known results.

If you want to publish in Nature/Science it has to be entirely novel. if it is a conference proceeding for a minor conference it is much less strict and can also be work in progress.
 

Related to Publishing a Result: Rules of Thumb

1. What is the purpose of publishing a result?

Publishing a result allows other scientists to review and replicate your work, advancing the knowledge and understanding of a particular field.

2. What are the basic rules of thumb for publishing a result?

Some basic rules of thumb for publishing a result include ensuring the research is original, accurately presenting data and methods, and adhering to ethical standards.

3. How do I choose the right journal to publish my result?

Consider the scope and audience of the journal, as well as its impact factor and prestige in the field. Consult with colleagues and mentors for recommendations.

4. What is the peer-review process and why is it important?

The peer-review process involves experts in the field evaluating and providing feedback on a research paper before it is published. This ensures the quality and validity of the research.

5. How can I increase the chances of my result being accepted for publication?

Ensure your research is well-written, organized, and follows the specific guidelines of the chosen journal. Address any feedback from peer reviewers and provide strong evidence to support your findings.

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