Qualifying Radiation Detectors for Space: Homework Help Needed

In summary, the conversation is about a homework assignment regarding the standard tests and procedures for qualifying a radiation detector before sending it to space. The person is asking for help with this topic and mentions their research so far, including finding some standards on a website. They also mention the importance of factors such as total ionizing dose and non-ionizing dose, as well as simulation programs like Omere and Fastrad. Overall, they are seeking information on the necessary procedures for using a radiation detector in a space mission or spacecraft.
  • #1
parazit
75
3
Hi everyone.
I have a homework about the standard tests and procedures of qualification of a radiation detector that have to completed before it sent to space.
Please help me about that topic asap.
Thank you so much.
 
Astronomy news on Phys.org
  • #2


parazit said:
Hi everyone.
I have a homework about the standard tests and procedures of qualification of a radiation detector that have to completed before it sent to space.
Please help me about that topic asap.
Thank you so much.

Tell us what you have found so far in your research. We certainly do not do your homework for you here on the PF.
 
  • #3


You are completely right.
For a couple of days i was searching in the librarys but there exist only nothing.On the other hand,i think i got something on the web.On that following page,http://www.ecss.nl/ there exist some standards but it is really complicated.I do not have an advanced experience on that topic but,some points are such as total ionizing dose and non-ionizing dose and also the simulation programs like Omere,Fastrad for a derived quantity.
But what i mean is basicly,if someone produces a device and if it will be used in a space mission or something like a space craft,what are the procedures of applying it.What kind of tests and what are other procedures that the inventor have to complete?
 

Related to Qualifying Radiation Detectors for Space: Homework Help Needed

1. What are radiation detectors used for in space?

Radiation detectors are used to monitor and measure the levels of radiation present in space. This is important for protecting astronauts and equipment from the harmful effects of radiation, as well as for studying and understanding the radiation environment in space.

2. How do radiation detectors work?

Radiation detectors work by detecting and measuring the energy deposited by radiation particles as they pass through the detector material. This energy is then converted into an electrical signal, which can be analyzed and used to determine the type and amount of radiation present.

3. What types of radiation can be detected in space?

There are several types of radiation that can be detected in space, including cosmic rays, solar particles, and radiation from other sources such as galactic sources or man-made sources like nuclear reactors. Each type of radiation has different characteristics and requires different types of detectors for accurate measurement.

4. How are radiation detectors qualified for use in space?

Radiation detectors must undergo rigorous testing and evaluation before they can be considered qualified for use in space. This includes exposure to simulated radiation environments, such as those found in space, to ensure they can accurately detect and measure radiation levels. The detectors must also meet specific requirements and standards set by space agencies.

5. Can radiation detectors be used on all types of space missions?

Not all radiation detectors are suitable for every type of space mission. Some detectors may be better suited for low Earth orbit missions, while others may be designed specifically for deep space missions. It is important to select the appropriate detector for the specific mission and radiation environment it will be exposed to.

Similar threads

Replies
14
Views
1K
  • High Energy, Nuclear, Particle Physics
Replies
24
Views
2K
  • Astronomy and Astrophysics
Replies
7
Views
2K
Replies
1
Views
794
  • High Energy, Nuclear, Particle Physics
Replies
13
Views
3K
Replies
4
Views
255
Replies
6
Views
1K
  • Astronomy and Astrophysics
Replies
3
Views
1K
  • Astronomy and Astrophysics
Replies
32
Views
3K
  • Astronomy and Astrophysics
Replies
20
Views
2K
Back
Top