Quantum entanglement and energy conservation

  • #1
FR4S3R97
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Hey I'm Fraser, I am a MEng graduate primary focused on Electrical and Mechanical Engineering. I am extremely interested in discussing and investigating how the dynamics of quantum entangled particles equate to conventional Newtonian laws.
As my current studies have proven conservation of energy is a universal law. How is it possible for two entangled particles to be equally or similarly affected when a force or energy is applied to a single member of the entangled pair? The production of such a pair would be invaluable to computing capabilities and far more. I am interested in building a mathatically capable team to further discuss the capabilities of such an idea. This discussion does not require qualifications only passion for the subject and the ability to bounce off one another. I look forward to hearing from any of you who are interested!

Kindest regards,
Fraser!

Reference: https://www.physicsforums.com/forums/quantum-physics.62/post-thread
 
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  • #2
Nugatory
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How is it possible for two entangled particles to be equally or similarly affected when a force or energy is applied to a single member of the entangled pair?
As far as the mathematical formalism of quantum mechanics is concerned, that’s not what happens. The formalism says that in an entangled system we don’t have two independent particles, we have a single quantum system described by a single wave function. We can perform two possible measurements on this system: energy at detector A, and energy at detector B. Say we know that the energy of the system is ##E_{tot}## and we’ve measured energy ##E_A## at detector A. After making that measurement we know that when and if we measure the energy at detector B we will get the result ##E_{tot}-E_A##, and we might explain this by saying that our measurement collapsed the wave function into the state “##E_A## at one detector, ##E_{tot}-E_A## at the other”. But there’s nothing here about what we do to one particle affecting the other; this is just how we expect a system with energy ##E_{tot}## to behave.
 
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  • #3
Nugatory
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This discussion does not require qualifications only passion for the subject and the ability to bounce off one another. I look forward to hearing from any of you who are interested!
Please remember the forum mission statement and also the rule requiring that new ideas be published in an appropriate peer-reviewed journal before they can be discussed here. We welcome questions about what entanglement is and is not, but we cannot host a freewheeling speculative discussion.
 
  • #4
DrChinese
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... I am extremely interested in discussing and investigating how the dynamics of quantum entangled particles equate to conventional Newtonian laws.

... I am interested in building a mathematically capable team to further discuss the capabilities of such an idea.

Reference: ... [PS I did not see a reference at your link]

:welcome:

Entanglement does not really relate to conventional or Newtonian rules. Although conservation rules apply, those are present in quantum mechanics as well.

You might want to study this area a bit first, as it is a deep area of current research. Papers with "Quantum Computing" in the title yielded 4,354 hits at the below link, including 723 in the past 12 months. Entanglement is a core topic in some of these papers.

https://arxiv.org/search/advanced?a...cts=show&size=200&order=-announced_date_first
 

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