Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Quantum entanglement,Is it possible

  1. Feb 29, 2012 #1
    Is Quantum entanglement really true ?, they say that that have observed it with photons and the distance between the photons doesn't matter , If this is true then information must travel faster than the speed of light right ? how is this possible ?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 29, 2012 #2
    Yes , that depends in what context you take the word 'information' into account.
    I am not greatly detailed on this but one way of achieving entanglement is by splitting particles into two integer spins ( half i think for the case of electrons) , each having +1/2 and -1/2 intrinsic angular spin .

    In other words say particle 'A' splits into 'B' and 'C' as such they are moved to an arbitrary distance apart , if we measure 'A' to be 1/2 or vice verca , the other part takes -1/2 orientation ( i think) to conserve angular momentum.


    -ibysaiyan
     
  4. Feb 29, 2012 #3
    Yes, it's true that there's a formal description of, and experimental realization of, something called quantum entanglement.

    That's right, as long as the entanglement can be preserved.

    No.

    Quantum entanglement has to do with relationships between entangled entities measured by global measurement parameters. So, as long as the relationship can be preserved, then the entanglement can be demonstrated.
     
  5. Feb 29, 2012 #4

    DrChinese

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    Welcome to PhysicsForums, adarshtr!

    Yes, quantum entanglement is a demonstrated phenomenon. There have been thousands of experiments performed which demonstrate this in all kinds of ways. This demonstrates what is known as quantum non-locality. What travels faster than the speed of light is not information exactly, it is often referred to as wave function (or state) collapse. As far as anyone knows, there is no way to use this to transmit a signal faster than c.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook