Quantum Entanglement & Hybridization

In summary: And this is not license for you to make silly statements and proclaim "well it's only an approximation".On the Approximation Farm, some approximations are more equal than others.
  • #1
LilandB
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I'm conflicted about how hybridization and quantum entanglement can simultaneously co-exist. I'm first confused about how quantum entanglement was proven. I tried to read to proves (I'm in grade 11 and planning on writing an ee on this) and it flew relatively over my head. Hybridization states that some of the electrons will switch orbital direction in order to add more bonds (simplified). But because of that, wouldn't the other electron also switch direction because of quantum entanglement? Assuming that it's easy to replicate quantum entanglement (I doubt it is), we could just forcefully change the orbital direction of an electron and know that the other electron would be in the opposite direction. But this would allow for information to travel faster than the speed of light which is no Bueno (we could allow information to travel through like a boolean value).
 
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  • #2
Hybrid orbitals are not "real." They are approximations to actual wave functions that are useful to understand the bonding and geometry of molecules. In fact, placing individual electrons in orbitals is itself an approximation: the actual multi-electron wave function is a more complicated beast.

Also, hybridization is not a dynamic process. It concerns stationary states of the atom. Rearrangement of electrons during chemical reactions is again a much more complicated process.

To better understand entanglement, I suggest you take a look at @DrChinese's website on Bell's theorem.
 
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  • #3
LilandB said:
I'm conflicted about how hybridization and quantum entanglement can simultaneously co-exist. I'm first confused about how quantum entanglement was proven. I tried to read to proves (I'm in grade 11 and planning on writing an ee on this) and it flew relatively over my head.
:welcome:

I suggest you need to take QM one step at a time. Nothing will make sense until you have a good grasp of the basics.
 
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  • #4
DrClaude said:
Hybrid orbitals are not "real."
They are as real as "actual" (??) wavefunctions. Schrödinger equation is a linear equation and linear combinations of solutions are perfectly valid solutions.
 
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hacivat said:
They are as real as "actual" (??) wavefunctions. Schrödinger equation is a linear equation and linear combinations of solutions are perfectly valid solutions.
Actual many-electron wave functions are not product of single-electron wave functions. Saying that a given electron is in a sp3 orbital is an approximation of the actual electronic structure of an atom.
 
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This is one of the cases "chemistry vs. physics" approach sounds different. The word "actual" means nothing to me. All we do is try to explain a complex reality with some models. Whether it is Schrödinger or Dirac eq or LCAO, etc... In this sense every explanation is an approximation.
 
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  • #7
hacivat said:
This is one of the cases "chemistry vs. physics" approach sounds different. The word "actual" means nothing to me. All we do is try to explain a complex reality with some models. Whether it is Schrödinger or Dirac eq or LCAO, etc... In this sense every explanation is an approximation.
And this is not license for you to make silly statements and proclaim "well it's only an approximation". On the Approximation Farm, some approximations are more equal than others.
hacivat said:
They are as real as "actual" (??) wavefunctions. Schrödinger equation is a linear equation and linear combinations of solutions are perfectly valid solutions.
Unfortunately they are not perfectly valid solutions to the Hamiltonian in question. For instance the electrons carry charge, and therefore directly interact.
 
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  • #8
hacivat said:
This is one of the cases "chemistry vs. physics" approach sounds different. The word "actual" means nothing to me. All we do is try to explain a complex reality with some models. Whether it is Schrödinger or Dirac eq or LCAO, etc... In this sense every explanation is an approximation.
There is no "chemistry vs. physics" in QT. Chemistry is a specialization of physics. There cannot be any contradiction between physics and chemistry. Both are exact natural sciences!
 

1. What is quantum entanglement?

Quantum entanglement is a phenomenon in which two or more particles become connected in such a way that the state of one particle is dependent on the state of the other, even if they are separated by large distances. This means that any change in one particle will instantly affect the other, regardless of the distance between them.

2. How does quantum entanglement work?

Quantum entanglement occurs when two or more particles are created or interact in such a way that their quantum states become correlated. This means that the particles are no longer described as separate entities, but rather as a single system with a shared state. This shared state is maintained even if the particles are separated, leading to instantaneous changes in one particle affecting the other.

3. What are the potential applications of quantum entanglement?

Quantum entanglement has the potential to revolutionize fields such as cryptography, communication, and computing. It can be used to create unbreakable encryption methods, enable secure communication over long distances, and improve the speed and efficiency of quantum computers.

4. What is hybridization in quantum mechanics?

Hybridization in quantum mechanics refers to the mixing of atomic orbitals to form new hybrid orbitals. This process occurs when atoms bond together to form molecules, and helps to explain the shapes and properties of molecules. Hybridization can also occur in other quantum systems, such as when energy levels of atoms or particles are combined.

5. How does hybridization relate to quantum entanglement?

Hybridization and quantum entanglement are both phenomena that occur at the quantum level, but they are not directly related. Quantum entanglement is a property of particles, while hybridization is a process that occurs between particles. However, both concepts are important in understanding and manipulating quantum systems, and can have significant implications in various fields of science and technology.

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