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Question about being theoretical physicist

  1. Yes. You may ignore experimental physics stuff, though.

    1 vote(s)
    9.1%
  2. Yes. But, you still need to learn experimental physics stuff, regardless if you like it or not.

    5 vote(s)
    45.5%
  3. Nope. Stick with being a mathematician.

    5 vote(s)
    45.5%
  1. Jul 24, 2008 #1
    I need help on this one immediately!!!!!!!!
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 24, 2008 #2

    Defennder

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  4. Jul 24, 2008 #3

    cristo

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    They are ridiculous options: have you studied any physics? Do you enjoy physics? If not, then why would you think of being a theoretical physicist?
     
  5. Jul 24, 2008 #4

    tmc

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    you should drop everything and become a theoretical physicist immediately.
     
  6. Jul 24, 2008 #5
    If you want to become a theoretical physicist, you still need to learn the experimental stuff. Physics is a science, it's equally theoretical and experimental. You don't need to like it or study it in-depth, just enough to understand what can and cannot be tested at the moment.
     
  7. Jul 24, 2008 #6

    G01

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    Well if you absolutely hate experiment then maybe science in general isn't for you. But since you did not give any info about yourself I can't offer any better advice than that.

    I second the suggestion that you read Zz's essay.
     
  8. Jul 25, 2008 #7
    Okay, guys. I will give my background a little bit.

    First of all, I kinda like physics. At the same time, I don't like it too much. I just like equations and numbers part of physics, but when I do experimental physics labs, it bores me to death. I got B- average on my tests, and I think the lab works are almost impossible to accomplish unless if I have a smart lab partner.
    On the other hand, I got straight A's on my geometry tests, and I ace every programming stuff.


    What should I research in the future?
     
  9. Jul 25, 2008 #8

    cristo

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    It sounds like you do not enjoy physics, so I'm not sure why you would contemplate a future in it. That says, in your profile you say you are a high school student, so I don't think you need to be contemplating what you will be undertaking research in. It sounds like you enjoy and are good at maths, so why not consider a degree in that?
     
  10. Jul 25, 2008 #9
    I don't think that the fact that you don't like labs detair you from being theoretical/mathematical physicist.

    Well I think you too much paying attention to the grades in those classes, I myself not that good at labs, mainly because I'm not the type of monkey who just do the task at hand (which is what the labs are really there for), I also want to understand why and when should the resolution of the machine be counted as a measure of the inaccuracy of the measurement, and when to use other options.

    Don't pick a degree judged only by your grades, cause they usually determined not only from you curiosity alone.
    For the labs for example, as you said you need a good partner, for example in my first semester I had a terrific partner and in the second semester a horrible one, ofcourse you can do the labs by your own but that would take too much time, so really it's about having a good partner with you that make the grade, at least in labs.
     
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