Question about black holes and graviational singularities.

In summary, the conversation discusses the magnitude of gravitational force needed to violate the Pauli exclusion principle and the potential for a black hole to form from a fallen star. It is mentioned that a neutron star may still form instead and that the force needed to create a gravitational singularity is dependent on the amount of matter compressed. The concept of a black hole being a collapsed gravitational singularity is questioned, suggesting that it may simply have enough mass for light not to escape.
  • #1
246
0
Do we know the magnitude of gravitational force needed to violate the Pauli exclusion principle?

Also, I my research has told me that violating the principle still isn't enough to turn the fallen star into a black hole. It could still become a neutrons star, so if that is the case, what magnitude of force is strong enough squeeze all matter around it to a gravitational singularity which is infinitely dense, with zero volume?

Also, I have been thinking. Does a black hole necessarily need to be a collapsed gravitational singularity. Couldn't it just have enough mass for light not to escape it?
 
Last edited:
Astronomy news on Phys.org
  • #2
Do we know the magnitude of gravitational force needed to violate the Pauli exclusion principle?
You won't violate it. It sais that the higher the density, the higher the energy of each particle, thus the higher the pressure. Pressure becomes significant in neutron stars, I'd guess (may be some orders of magnitude off) it's about 10^28 bar at the core.
It could still become a neutrons star, so if that is the case, what magnitude of force is strong enough squeeze all matter around it to a gravitational singularity which is infinitely dense, with zero volume?
You just have to put enough matter in a small enough volume. You'd have to compress a small amount of matter much stronger that a larger mass to generate a black hole.
Does a black hole necessarily need to be a collapsed gravitational singularity. Couldn't it just have enough mass for light not to escape it?
When light can't escape, matter must move inwards, as inevitably as it moves towards future.
 

1. What is a black hole?

A black hole is a region in space where the gravitational pull is so strong that nothing, including light, can escape from it. It is formed when a massive star dies and collapses under its own gravity.

2. How are black holes and gravitational singularities related?

A black hole is essentially a region of space where a gravitational singularity exists. This singularity is a point of infinite density and zero volume, and it is surrounded by a boundary called the event horizon.

3. Can we see black holes?

No, we cannot see black holes directly since they do not emit any light. However, we can observe the effects of black holes on their surrounding environment, such as the distortion of light and the motion of nearby objects.

4. Can anything escape from a black hole?

Once something crosses the event horizon and enters a black hole, it cannot escape. This includes light, which is why black holes appear black. However, some theoretical models suggest that particles can escape through a process called Hawking radiation.

5. Are there different types of black holes?

Yes, there are several types of black holes based on their mass and properties. The three main types are stellar black holes, intermediate-mass black holes, and supermassive black holes, which can range from a few times the mass of the sun to billions of times the mass of the sun.

Suggested for: Question about black holes and graviational singularities.

2
Replies
63
Views
2K
Replies
23
Views
1K
Replies
11
Views
1K
Replies
12
Views
1K
Replies
2
Views
835
Replies
5
Views
1K
Replies
13
Views
1K
Replies
3
Views
821
Back
Top