Question about new water filter products from South Korea

  • Thread starter Bararontok
  • Start date
  • #1
Bararontok
298
0
There are 2 new models of water filters made by South Korean companies and this is what they claim:

The Wave-Q and Megafresh Filter, both of which are made in South Korea, use a device called a vortex pump to circulate the water in a container. The circulating water is then forced through a filter in the container which is filled with alkalis, and this absorbs sediment, decreases water acidity, and arranges the water molecules into hexagonal clusters that make it easier for the digestive system to absorb the water.

The two companies claim that these devices perform their described functions. Are these claims supported by scientific evidence? Does the hexagonal alkaline water generator produce water that is easier for the digestive system to absorb?

Sources:


www.hexagonalwatersystem.com

www.megafresh.com.tw
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
Mech_Engineer
Science Advisor
Gold Member
2,586
172
The circulating water is then forced through a filter in the container which is filled with alkalis

Well this doesn't sound right, since an alkali is: "a basic, ionic salt of an alkali metal or alkaline Earth metal element," unless of course they're adding salt to the water...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alkali

and this absorbs sediment,
Any standard activated carbon filter (or many other kinds of filters for that matter) can do this. An "alkali" isn't required...

decreases water acidity,
This might be possible, but of course is assumes water acidity is a problem in the first place...

and arranges the water molecules into hexagonal clusters that make it easier for the digestive system to absorb the water.
Now THIS is completely false. Water is a liquid, and can't be arranged in any sort of clusters (unless you freeze it).

The two companies claim that these devices perform their described functions. Are these claims supported by scientific evidence?
I seriously doubt any of their claims are supported, or even descriptive of what the product actually does.
 
  • #3
Bararontok
298
0
Actually, the thread originator has done research on this and found out that this technology is a hoax.

The following link exposes the concept of hexagonal water as a hoax:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hexagonal_water

Although the motor used in the pump was quite fascinating, since the rotor is not mechanically coupled to the commutator and is held in place solely by the forces of the rotating magnetic field and the fact that the rotor is a permanent magnet which makes it stick to the metal base of the pump.
 

Suggested for: Question about new water filter products from South Korea

Replies
2
Views
406
  • Last Post
Replies
12
Views
471
  • Last Post
Replies
23
Views
602
Replies
1
Views
265
Replies
1
Views
278
Replies
4
Views
517
Replies
10
Views
682
  • Last Post
Replies
2
Views
225
  • Last Post
Replies
12
Views
361
  • Last Post
Replies
14
Views
392
Top