Question about the big problems in math

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In summary, the conversation discusses the potential outcomes and implications of solving major mathematical problems, specifically Hilbert's problems and the 7 millenium problems. One individual mentions that according to Godel, some of the problems may be true but unsolvable. Another individual suggests that solving the P vs NP problem could lead to a significant advancement in technology, but another person argues that technological progress depends on various factors such as materials sciences.
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kramer733
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Question about the "big problems in math"

What happens when all of hilbert's problems and the 7 millenium problems are solved? What will this do to the advancement of mathematics? What sort of applications will be used when these problems are solved? I'm not in university but i'd still like to know. It sort of piqued my curiosity when i heard about these problems.
 
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According to Godel, some of the problems may be true yet be unsolvable.
 
  • #3


Hey my friend also says that if somebody solves the P vs NP problem, we could advance our technology by 150 years. He's in 2nd year computer science. Not sure if that's true though.
 
  • #4


kramer733 said:
Hey my friend also says that if somebody solves the P vs NP problem, we could advance our technology by 150 years. He's in 2nd year computer science. Not sure if that's true though.

nah, it just has implications for data speed and encryption

you have to keep in mind that technological advancements depend on lots of different factors...materials sciences being a major one
 
  • #5


I can understand your curiosity about the big problems in math, including Hilbert's problems and the 7 Millennium problems. These are important and challenging questions that have yet to be solved by mathematicians.

If and when these problems are solved, it would be a significant achievement for the field of mathematics. It would demonstrate that our understanding of these fundamental concepts has advanced to a level where we can tackle such complex problems. This would also open up new avenues for further research and development in mathematics.

In terms of applications, the solutions to these problems would have a profound impact on various fields, such as physics, computer science, and engineering. For example, the proof of the Poincaré Conjecture (one of the Millennium problems) has already led to advancements in topology and theoretical physics. Similarly, the solution to the Riemann Hypothesis (another Millennium problem) could have implications for cryptography and number theory.

Even though you are not in university, it is great to see your interest in these big problems in math. I would encourage you to continue exploring and learning about these and other mathematical concepts, as they have the potential to shape our understanding of the world and drive technological advancements in the future.
 

Related to Question about the big problems in math

What are the big problems in math?

The big problems in math, also known as the Millennium Prize Problems, are a set of seven unsolved mathematical problems that were identified by the Clay Mathematics Institute in 2000. The problems range from number theory to geometry and have been some of the most challenging and elusive problems in mathematics.

Why are these problems important?

The Millennium Prize Problems are important because they represent some of the most fundamental and difficult questions in mathematics. Solving these problems would have a significant impact on our understanding of mathematics and could potentially lead to new breakthroughs in other fields such as physics and computer science.

Who has attempted to solve these problems?

Many mathematicians, both amateur and professional, have attempted to solve the Millennium Prize Problems. Some of the most famous attempts include Andrew Wiles' proof of Fermat's Last Theorem and Grigori Perelman's proof of the Poincaré Conjecture.

Have any of the problems been solved?

As of now, only one of the Millennium Prize Problems has been solved – the Poincaré Conjecture by Grigori Perelman in 2006. However, his proof has not been formally accepted by the mathematical community and he declined the $1 million prize offered by the Clay Mathematics Institute.

What is the current status of these problems?

All of the Millennium Prize Problems are still open and have not been formally solved. However, there has been significant progress made on some of the problems, and many mathematicians continue to work towards finding solutions. The Clay Mathematics Institute has also announced new prizes for solutions to important subproblems within the Millennium Prize Problems.

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