Question related to quantization of the magnetic field

In summary, when trapped hydrogen atoms are exposed to a magnetic field, the Zeeman effect occurs, causing some electrons to gain energy and others to lose energy. When the magnetic field is removed, the electrons can return to their previous state, releasing the energy they gained. This energy is in the form of a photon, which can be in the microwave or radio wave range of the electromagnetic spectrum. Unlike in the case of an electromagnetic field, where electrons only change their quantum number n by absorbing or emitting a photon, in a magnetic field, the electrons' energy change is directly proportional to the strength of the field. Therefore, when the magnetic field is removed, the electrons' energy also changes, without the emission of a photon.
  • #1
fluidistic
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I wonder what happens if you have trapped hydrogen atoms and you apply a magnetic field. We could observe the Zeeman effect; some electrons would gain energy and some other would lose energy due to the magnetic field. Say an electron gained some energy. Now you remove the magnetic field, the electron could return to its previous state, losing the energy it gained from the magnetic field. My question is... in what form does this electron lose its "tiny" energy?
I think the only answer would be a photon (in case of a magnetic field of a few teslas the photon might be in the microwave or radio wave range of the EM spectra, I believe) but I'm not 100% sure.
I understand that if I apply an EM field (flux of photons), the electrons will only change their quantum number n, absorbing or emiting a photon in the process. But in the case of a magnetic or electric field, I have no idea.

EDIT: Some other thoughts. There can't be emission/absorption of photon when the electron change their quantum number "m". Because the M field, as far as I know, doesn't contains photons. So when you remove the M field, some electron will gain some energy but if there's no photon, I have no idea how the electrons "absorb" the energy.
 
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  • #2
I do have the answer. In fact it was very obvious. The energy change of the electrons is directly proportional to the applied B field. Since we remove continuously the magnetic field, so do the electrons change their energy. So there's no emission of transition like in the case of electrons changing their n number.
 

1. What is quantization of the magnetic field?

Quantization of the magnetic field refers to the fact that magnetic fields can only exist in discrete, quantized amounts. This means that the strength of a magnetic field can only be certain values, rather than a continuous range.

2. How does quantization of the magnetic field relate to quantum mechanics?

Quantization of the magnetic field is a fundamental principle of quantum mechanics. It arises from the quantization of angular momentum in quantum systems, and is a result of the wave-like behavior of particles such as electrons.

3. What is the significance of quantization of the magnetic field?

The quantization of the magnetic field has important implications in many areas of physics, including quantum mechanics, electromagnetism, and condensed matter physics. It helps to explain phenomena such as the stability of atoms, the behavior of superconductors, and the properties of magnetic materials.

4. Can the magnetic field of an object be quantized?

No, the magnetic field of an object cannot be quantized. It is the strength of the magnetic field that is quantized, not the field itself. The field itself is a continuous, vector quantity that varies in space and time.

5. How is quantization of the magnetic field measured?

Quantization of the magnetic field can be measured using a device called a magnetometer, which can detect and measure the strength of magnetic fields. The quantization of the magnetic field can also be observed indirectly through various experiments and calculations in quantum mechanics and electromagnetism.

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