Questions on super gamama rays

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Main Question or Discussion Point

A person being exposed to radiation (restricted to gamma) can have a time dependent effects. One can die in a year, months, or even days depending on the dose. Is it possible that gammas can kill a person almost instantly?
 

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  • #2
Astronuc
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Yes, it would be possible, but that would require an extraordinary burst of radiation (gamma or otherwise). Gamma's are highly penetrating photons which interact by Compton effect and if E> 1.022 MeV, by pair production. The ionizing effects of gammas and the secondary radiation (electrons) ionizes the molecules in the body.

Here is one example of an acute radiation exposure.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louis_Slotin#The_criticality_accident

I haven't reviewed this nor confirmed accuracy which should be done with a more reliable source.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radiation_poisoning#Table_of_exposure_levels_and_symptoms

On September 30, 1999, a criticality accident occured at the Tokai nuclear fuel plant (JCO Co. Ltd., a 100% subsidiary of Sumitomo Metal Mining Co. Ltd.) in Japan. . . . The chain reaction caused heavy releases of gamma and neutron radiation. Three workers were exposed to doses of up to 17 Sv (Sieverts), causing severe radiation sickness. The worker exposed to the higest dose died on December 21, 1999. The worker exposed to the second highest dose of 6 - 10 Sv died on April 27, 2000. 68 other persons were irradiated at lower levels. Among them were the workers who stopped the chain reaction: they were exposed to doses of up to 119.79 mSv, exceeding the 100 mSv limit for emergency situations. The annual dose limit for workers is 50 mSv (while ICRP currently recommends 20 mSv). As of October 7, 1999, radiation levels remained high inside the plant building, preventing inspection of the damage inside the plant.
http://www.wise-uranium.org/eftokc.html
 
  • #3
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Thx for the result. I am a radiation worker myself so I know what are the effects. However, a while back Russia gave VN a type of radiolocical warfair weapon to stop China's advancing troops. It kills waves of people using radiation. I wouldn't think radiation would be that powerful.
 
  • #4
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I find the claim that Russia gave the Vietnamese ray guns difficult to credit.

The energy in absorbed radiation ultimately ends up as heat, and we know enough heat kills cells. So yes, it's possible to absorb enough radiation to die immediately. However, this is many orders of magnitude more than LD50, so anyone using these putative ray guns would be in danger of dying themselves from backscattered radiation.
 
  • #5
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I find the claim that Russia gave the Vietnamese ray guns difficult to credit.

The energy in absorbed radiation ultimately ends up as heat, and we know enough heat kills cells. So yes, it's possible to absorb enough radiation to die immediately. However, this is many orders of magnitude more than LD50, so anyone using these putative ray guns would be in danger of dying themselves from backscattered radiation.[/QUOT

It's correct that radiation cause heat. However, I don't think that's the case. If you cook, that's no different than conventional fire. I believe it's through the ionizing mechanism. Radiation can be block using water, lead, poly... only need 2 inches of lead to reduce it to 1/10.
 
  • #6
Vanadium 50
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I still don't find the claim that Russians are passing out ray guns credible.

Given that, it seems...um...premature to try and figure out how they work.
 
  • #7
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I still don't find the claim that Russians are passing out ray guns credible.

Given that, it seems...um...premature to try and figure out how they work.
Well, the source comes from a guy who in the battle himself. The weapon, by Geneva rule, can only be use for a country's self defense.
 
  • #8
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The "Geneva rule"? You mean the Geneva Convention? Of 1949? Nothing about rayguns in that, I'm afraid. But in any event, this conversation has moved from the scientific, past the speculative and is rapidly approaching the silly.
 
  • #9
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The "Geneva rule"? You mean the Geneva Convention? Of 1949? Nothing about rayguns in that, I'm afraid. But in any event, this conversation has moved from the scientific, past the speculative and is rapidly approaching the silly.
well, whatever rule that is. The world must come together at some point. I don't know what's your concern here. You do not believe such a weapon exist or you do not believe Russians give out such weapon. It doesn't matter, my question is already answer. Thx.
 
  • #10
well, whatever rule that is. The world must come together at some point. I don't know what's your concern here. You do not believe such a weapon exist or you do not believe Russians give out such weapon. It doesn't matter, my question is already answer. Thx.
who is this troll?
 

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