*Quick question: When is VENUS visable in the sky in this period ?

In summary, the conversation revolves around determining when Venus is visible in the sky and how to figure it out using a polar graph. The key is to understand the Earth's rotation and revolution around the sun, and how it affects the visibility of Venus. It is possible to see Venus in the morning or evening, but never both at the same time. The conversation also briefly mentions Mars and how it can be visible in the sky at different times depending on the Earth's rotation. However, this is subject to seasonal changes and not accounted for in this scenario.
  • #1
nukeman
655
0
Given the following: Its a polar graph.

I am trying to figure out when is VENUS visable in the sky during this period (dawn, dusk, noon, midnight) ?

How do you figure that out? Also, Venus is red, Earth is green on the chart.

Thanks!

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  • #2
Is it at all possible that Venus is visible at midnight?
 
  • #3
Also, remember that the Earth rotates in the same direction that it revolves around the sun (counter-clockwise in your graph). This should help you figure out when it is visible in the morning, and when in the evening. Try drawing the Earth as a larger circle, instead of a dot, and draw on which part of the Earth it is day and which it is night.
 
  • #4
am I right to assume that venus is visable from Earth in the evening and morning ?

I need some help here
 
  • #5
Morning and evening - yes.
 
  • #6
Borek said:
Morning and evening - yes.

Great, can u possible tell me how, since I have to answer the same questoion for mars, which are the blue points
 
  • #7
Without doing your homework for you, chronologically the Earth at E1 corresponds to the position of Venus at V1, and so forth. Since the Earth turns on its axis so that planetfall brings the Sun into view in the east, then E spins counterclockwise in your diagram. So V1 will come into view first for E1 and then the Sun at the center of your diagram will come into view. Thus, Venus comes into view in the early morning (before sunrise) for the Earth at E1.
 
  • #8
Arch2008 said:
Without doing your homework for you, chronologically the Earth at E1 corresponds to the position of Venus at V1, and so forth. Since the Earth turns on its axis so that planetfall brings the Sun into view in the east, then E spins counterclockwise in your diagram. So V1 will come into view first for E1 and then the Sun at the center of your diagram will come into view. Thus, Venus comes into view in the early morning (before sunrise) for the Earth at E1.

Oh ok great. So, its not visable at night then based on those points?

How about mars?
 
  • #9
V5 looks like it would be visible for some time from E5 before sunrise.

A point on E1 is/has been facing away from the Sun when M1 is in view, so night viewing.
 
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  • #10
nukeman said:
Great, can u possible tell me how, since I have to answer the same questoion for mars, which are the blue points


E1 through E7 represent points in Earth's year; each one is a few weeks apart. At any given one of them, Earth is spinning on its axis like a top - these are its days.

Imagining yourself standing on that dot that is Earth, you are spinning counterclockwise, round and round. No, forget imagining - draw it. Draw a dot on the Earth's dot that represents you, standing on the Earth.

From your point of view, a little dot on the bigger dot, which is rotating counterclockwsie, the sun will move past you from left to right. It will rise on your left and set on your right. When the Earth dot rotates so that the you-dot is directly away from the Sun, that is midnight to you, when the you-dot is pointed directly at the sun, that is noon to you.

This is key. Understanding this CCW rotation is the key to knowing the day-night cycle of Earth, particularly when it is sunrise and when its sunset.

Now, as the you-dot observes the sun rise on its left and set on its right, where is Mars? Is Mars ever visible in you-dot's sky at the same time as the Sun? As you-dot rotates, does Mars become visible before the Sun becomes visible? Does Mars stay visible after the Sun sets?
 
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  • #11
As you were suggested several times - replace dots with small circles, and put a dot - which will be observer - on the planet surface. When observer is close to the Sun - what time is it? When observer is on the other side of the circle - what time is it? Is it possible to see Venus when you are on the side opposite to Sun?
 
  • #12
nukeman said:
am I right to assume that venus is visable from Earth in the evening and morning ?

I need some help here

Note that it is sometimes visible in the morning and sometimes in the evening, but never visible in both the morning and the evening.
 
  • #13
phyzguy said:
Note that it is sometimes visible in the morning and sometimes in the evening, but never visible in both the morning and the evening.

That's not quite true. It depends on where you are and on the night length.
 
  • #14
Borek said:
That's not quite true. It depends on where you are and on the night length.

There are some edge conditions in real life, yes.

But in this scenario we are not provided with data to account for seasonal changes. You can say nothing at all about day/night length when providing answers.
 
  • #15
Sure. Just the statement was a little bit too strong to my liking. Especially after not seeing nights for two weeks far North this Summer.
 

Related to *Quick question: When is VENUS visable in the sky in this period ?

1. What is the best time to see Venus in the sky?

The best time to see Venus in the sky varies depending on the time of year and your location. However, generally speaking, Venus is most visible in the evening sky during the months of January to May, and in the morning sky during the months of September to December.

2. How do I locate Venus in the sky?

Venus can be easily located in the sky by looking towards the west in the evening or towards the east in the morning. It is the brightest planet in our solar system and can often be seen without the use of a telescope or binoculars.

3. Is Venus visible all year round?

Yes, Venus is visible in the sky all year round. However, its visibility may be affected by weather conditions and its position in relation to the Sun. During certain times of the year, it may be more difficult to see Venus due to its position in the sky.

4. How long can I see Venus in the sky?

The amount of time Venus is visible in the sky depends on its position in relation to the Sun. During certain times of the year, it may be visible for several hours in the evening or morning sky. However, during other times, it may only be visible for a short period of time before setting or rising with the Sun.

5. Can I see Venus during the day?

Yes, it is possible to see Venus during the day if you know where to look. However, since it is much dimmer than the Sun, it can be difficult to spot. It is recommended to use a telescope or binoculars to view Venus during the day.

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