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R136a defies Laws of Stellar Evolution

  1. Dec 11, 2015 #1
    At 265 SM, and age 1.7 Million years, at 163,000 Light Years Away in the R136 cluster, is R136a. But, it shouldn't be alive now. It should have exploded given the model of Solar Mass Evolution at 200,000-375,000 Years old of age. It's in it's Wolf-Rayet phrase, but it still shouldn't be alive. I'm confused by the dynamics in this scenario. It's larger than an average WR star (28.8 SR) but with it's energy output and luminosity of 8,700,000 Suns, it should have already died. I think we should study it more because this is a serious mystery for stellar evolution. Does anyone know anything more?
     
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  3. Dec 11, 2015 #2

    Vanadium 50

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    This is almost certainly from a merger of lighter stars. Google "blue straggler".
     
  4. Dec 12, 2015 #3

    Chronos

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    R136a has already shed a significant amount of it original mass, so its continued existence is less a mystery. It may also be a close binary system, although that is arguable.
     
  5. Dec 13, 2015 #4
    How do you get these numbers?
     
  6. Dec 14, 2015 #5
    Models based off Stellar Evolution. I studied that a lot.
     
  7. Dec 14, 2015 #6
    True. Although it would be very hard to determine.
     
  8. Dec 14, 2015 #7
    I did. Although it should have exploded if that much mass was to merge. Plus it would be rotating fast.
     
  9. Dec 14, 2015 #8

    Vanadium 50

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    Really? Are you an expert in stellar evolution? Or is this a guess? If it's not a guess, why? What would cause the explosion?
     
  10. Dec 14, 2015 #9
    I'm not an "expert" on the subject nor do I consider myself one. But my reasoning is based off the total mass required to fuse. In the event such massive stars were to collide, they would merge at very high speeds due to the gravitational influence of approach. As the cores merge, it would leave a gap. Because the merging process makes both stars unstable for a certain period of time, the cores mass would make the orbital velocity very fast. If one core was more massive than the other by a certain level, the unbalance would be catastrophic. The rotation of the core would accelerate to the point of which breakup is inevitable. A pair instability supernova would obscure from the unbound core. Plus, there has been no evidence of extreme rotation, which in Blue Stragglers, is extremely fast, almost to breakup velocity.
     
  11. Dec 14, 2015 #10

    Chronos

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    If RS-136a was part of a close companion binary system it would be expected to be an x ray variable. Since no variability has been detected in its x ray spectrum, it is argueably unlikely to be a member of a close binary system.
     
  12. Dec 14, 2015 #11
    Where precisely do they quote your 200 000-375 000 years?
     
  13. Dec 16, 2015 #12
    It's a stellar evolution chart. It's on Wikipedia, but I used the variables to follow it down further.
     
  14. Dec 16, 2015 #13
    The thing is, you cannot. Care for an explanation why?
     
  15. Dec 16, 2015 #14
    Yes, Please. I would like to understand more.
     
  16. Dec 17, 2015 #15
    It's impossible for a star to explode appreciably sooner than about 2 million years, no matter how massive. Do you spot the reason?
     
  17. Dec 17, 2015 #16
    Energy vs Pressure. Although Massive, and having a very prominent gravitational field, there's a counterbalance in the core caused by the intense energy it radiates. This prevents the star from collapsing until it has lost enough mass to be able to counteract the force of gravity forcing it to collapse. Since the star was so massive, it was able to hold it's own for a while against this immense pressure. But, in the process this force is causing a powerful stellar wind, making the star lose the mass of the sun every 50,000 years, but the rate is decreasing as it loses more mass, from a possible Solar Mass every 10,000 at birth in recent studies.

    However, (This was last year, and I don't remember the source so don't ask please) Inside the massive star, there is a barrier between the two forces. Although the collision should be too intense and violent for atoms to fuse, there's a limit. The core is generally unpredictable. However, unlike the Earth, which has gravitational fields that vary notably, Stars can have this too, but in much, much, smaller differences. However, in massive stars, this is critical. The weight of the barrier will increase in certain areas, slowing down the effects of energy causing the atoms to be unable to fuse. If you shoot a bullet through a series of walls, it will slow down with each wall it passes through, until it stops. In a key area of this layer, the force of energy is no longer strong enough to effect fusion. The heat allows fusion of heavier elements very quickly. Iron is fused in a few thousand years, and as this mass grows greater, energy is suppressed more. However, a star this massive cannot form a black hole or neutron star due to the unstable pressure and heat now at the core. It explodes as a Pair-Instability Supernova.
     
  18. Dec 17, 2015 #17
    The reason is that the luminosity of a star is limited by Eddington luminosity.
     
  19. Dec 17, 2015 #18
    Okay.
     
  20. Dec 17, 2015 #19
    And Eddington luminosity is proportional to the mass of star.
     
  21. Dec 17, 2015 #20
    Okay.

    I thought it had surpassed that limit according to recent studies.
     
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