Random thoughts thread while microwaving dinner

In summary, the conversation was about a theory regarding what happens when you microwave food with clingfilm sealed over it. It was speculated that the air inside the clingfilm pocket becomes excited and expands, creating a bulge or bubble. When the food is removed from the microwave, the air inside cools and the clingfilm tightly seals, creating a vacuum. The question was raised about what happens to the nitrogen gas inside the bubble and why it doesn't fill the pocket again in gas state. Some possible explanations were discussed, including the possibility of some of the gas escaping from the bubble. The conversation was then closed with a reminder that there is already a designated thread for random thoughts.
  • #1
skyshrimp
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Post your drunk thoughts here (AKA, not thread worthy).

Beer induced brain fart 1.

When you microwave your dinner with clingfilm sealed over the top, the electrons in that air pocket get excited and the pocket expands (due to the air molecules moving faster right?). You get a clingfilm bulge/bubble, ready to pop if microwaved for too long.

If you take the bowl out, the air compresses so much that the clingfilm vacuums the food and becomes instantly and tightly sealed.

What happened to the air inside as it cooled slightly from that hot temp that was causing the pocket to burst? It's still virtually as hot as it was before in was heated.

I'm guessing it's something to do with water vapour.
 
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  • #2
skyshrimp said:
Post your drunk thoughts here (AKA, not thread worthy).

What happened to the air inside as it cooled slightly ...

I'm guessing it's something to do with water vapour.
Good guess...
 
  • #3
My drinking bender has extended to day 2 :cool:

I'll get it tomorrow on my own, but I like to test my mettle. The air pocket was filled with 78% nitrogen. Nitrogen is comprised of 3 tightly bonded atoms and should remain in gas state. The plate of food is still tightly vacuumed after it's removed from the microwaves/heat. What happened to the nitrogen and why doesn't it fill the pocket again in gas state?

I can vision the steam from the food creating the expansion of the clingfilm, but that doesn't explain the vacuum and what happened to the nitrogen.
 
  • #4
skyshrimp said:
My drinking bender has extended to day 2 :cool:
The plate of food is still tightly vacuumed after it's removed from the microwaves/heat. What happened to the nitrogen and why doesn't it fill the pocket again in gas state?

I can vision the steam from the food creating the expansion of the clingfilm, but that doesn't explain the vacuum and what happened to the nitrogen.
Nitrogen gas is N2, not 3 atoms.
Just a thought: Are you certain that some of the gas didn't escape the bubble? Perhaps some hissed out at the seam between the film and the bowl? The interface could reseal as the pressure inside reduces. With less actual gas molecules inside the bubble, the pressure could drop, so that the outside pressure actually pushes in on the film, creating your vacuum.
 
  • #5
I see what you're saying. It's a possibility. Some of the air might of pushed out from the edge of the clingfilm seal when the water vapour from the heated food created the bubble. When it cooled again (and the clingfilm edge is possibly sealed tight again from heat), the vapour returns to water and the space creates a vacuum.
 
  • #6
We already have a "Random thoughts", so this is closed.
 
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Related to Random thoughts thread while microwaving dinner

1. What is the purpose of a "Random thoughts thread while microwaving dinner"?

The purpose of a "Random thoughts thread while microwaving dinner" is to provide a space for individuals to share their thoughts and ideas while they are waiting for their dinner to cook in the microwave. It is a way for people to engage in casual conversation and connect with others over common experiences.

2. Is it safe to use a microwave for cooking?

Yes, it is safe to use a microwave for cooking as long as the appliance is used correctly and according to the manufacturer's instructions. Microwaves use electromagnetic waves to heat food, which is a safe and efficient method of cooking.

3. Can microwaving food affect its nutritional value?

Microwaving food can affect its nutritional value, just like any cooking method. However, because microwaves cook food quickly and with little added fat, they can actually help retain more nutrients compared to other cooking methods like boiling or frying.

4. How does a microwave work?

A microwave works by producing electromagnetic waves that cause water molecules in food to vibrate, creating heat. The heat is then transferred to the rest of the food, cooking it evenly and quickly. Microwaves also have a rotating turntable to ensure even cooking.

5. Can microwaving food cause cancer?

There is no scientific evidence to suggest that microwaving food can cause cancer. The electromagnetic waves used in microwaves are non-ionizing, meaning they do not have enough energy to damage DNA and cause cancer. As long as the microwave is in good working condition and used correctly, it is a safe cooking method.

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