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Rational approach for specifying a Microscope

  1. Dec 7, 2009 #1
    Has anyone worked out a functional Parametric chart that enables one to choose a appropriate Microscope (exclude Scanning electron MicroScopes(MS)) amongst the multitude of choices for a modern academic micro-biological & research lab, hence formulated a general guideline? The MS should feature a Camera and computer interface as a requirement.Please highlight some IMPORTANT Technical Spec's,constructs and feature options to be considered for a judicious choice.
     
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  3. Dec 7, 2009 #2

    mgb_phys

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    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  4. Dec 8, 2009 #3
    mgb_phys: Thanks !
    I suppose the list you have provided is from "premium" brands/vendors, who have established branding and sophistication of manufacturing style and systems.Any ideas on what contributes to pricing differentials if the technology/ design has not changed radically to provide for some significant scientific benefits. How about cost efficient manufacturers like : www.alltion-microscope.com[/url] oR [url]http://www.meijitechno.com/[/URL]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 24, 2017
  5. Dec 8, 2009 #4

    Andy Resnick

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    You gave us no clues about what you want to use the microscope forbrightfield, fluorescence, stereo, live cells, immunostaining, tissue slices, needed magnifications (or frame rates for dynamic imaging)....

    There's a lot of things a good microscope can do. In all honesty, at the high end, it's less about the specific instrument and more about the sales/support person who will help you when you get stuck.

    If you have absolutely no idea, I recommend at least browsing through 'MicroscopyU' to see all the different techiques available.
     
  6. Dec 10, 2009 #5
    Andy R Thanks, actually I was looking for some clue to get started. Actually the requirement is a Phase contrast Microscope with a stipulated budget (say around US$2000.- (+/-)6% permissible allowance [@ 1US$=47,50 and inclusive of applicable Customs]. I am presently getting to know principles and pertinent aspects - Anyone who has got some deep experience to sharing any thing (however trivial) in a relevant context (accessories, features & functionality differences between vendors,etc) will be appreciated gratefully.
     
  7. Dec 10, 2009 #6

    Andy Resnick

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    You will have a hard time finding a phase contrast microscope for $2k. Is this for cell/tissue culture (i.e. live cell imaging)? The Nikon TMS is decent, and Lecia and Zeiss make comparable models.
     
  8. Dec 10, 2009 #7

    mgb_phys

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    Andy, are there chinese clone microscopes out yet?
    In theodolites you can buy exact copies of Nikon, Leica etc from China-optical for 1/2-1/4 the price.

    Not even clones - they are made on the same production line that Nikon outsourced to, they even advertise on facing pages in the surveying magazines.
     
  9. Dec 10, 2009 #8

    Andy Resnick

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    I don't know much about the chinese clones, but I'm sure they exist. The Russian (LOMO) and Polish (PZO) microscope optics are reasonable. My experience with off-brands is not good. Yes, they are cheaper and generally sort-of work ok, but I have a lot of experience building and modifying microscopes so I can deal with (for example) poor sample stages and flake-y light sources.

    Since the OP sounds very inexperienced, I wouldn't recommend dealing with a company that does not provide some support service.

    Edit: also, a lot of the (American) low-quality microscopes still use DIN standard objectives, which should really be avoided unless there is a good reason not to (i.e. legacy equipment)
     
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