Reaction of 118 elements simultaneously = product?

  • Thread starter hyunxu
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  • #1
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This may be bit weird but really do we get any product after the reaction of 118 elements of the periodic table.We know masses of reactant = masses of product.But no so in nuclear fission and fusion.Anyhow finally what might be that product?and what is going to be its state.


Please explain me well because I'm just a school student.

Waiting for your best responses.
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  • #2
Drakkith
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Hi hyunxu. It's not clear to me what you're asking. What is reacting? All 118 elements of the periodic table at the same time? What kind of reaction are you asking about?
 
  • #3
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Hi hyunxu. It's not clear to me what you're asking. What is reacting? All 118 elements of the periodic table at the same time? What kind of reaction are you asking about?
I mean like mixing all the sliced fruits together in a fruit salad.
 
  • #4
Drakkith
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If you mean fusion reactions, then you'll get a mess of different elements and isotopes. I wouldn't be able to even begin to list them all.
 
  • #5
Borek
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On the other hand, if you will mix all elements at normal temperature (that is, far from conditions required for fusion) you will get some difficult to predict mixture of products. More reactive elements will react quickly, the less reactive ones will stay inert or get passivated. Final result would depend on many factors, like the initial form of the elements and their relative initial amounts.
 
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  • #7
Vanadium 50
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On the other hand, if you will mix all elements at normal temperature (that is, far from conditions required for fusion) you will get some difficult to predict mixture of products.
Oh, I think I can predict what will happen when the cesium and the fluorine get together...

 
  • #8
Ygggdrasil
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Perhaps an interesting thought experiment: Assume you have one atom of each of the 118 elements. Given standard temperature and pressure, what is the most thermodynamically stable configuration of those atoms?

We probably don't have enough data on heats of formation to determine the answer, but there should at least be a unique answer to the question in theory (at least w/o complications from the decay chains of the radioactive elements).
 

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