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Real pictures of black hole eating a star?

  1. Feb 8, 2012 #1
    I keep finding articles about the black hole that scientists at Berkeley found eating a star, live. I wanna see the photos or video, or what the founders themselves looked at to deduce it was a black hole eating a star. Google is dead to me. Can't find crap.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 8, 2012 #2

    davenn

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    Cygnus X1 was from memory the first identified black hole, many years ago. It is drawing a stream of material from the nearby star. We cant visually see that stream of material spiralling into the black hole. And for obvious reasons cannot see the black hole.
    But the detection is done primarialy by the Xrays and other hi energy particles that are emitted from that stream of matter as it spirals into the black hole and is highly compressed

    do a google search on Cygnus X-1 there's masses of info with Xray imaging etc

    eg.... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cygnus_X-1

    cheers
    Dave
     
  4. Feb 8, 2012 #3
    Thanks for the info, tho the one I am talking about was reported to have been found in 2011.
     
  5. Feb 8, 2012 #4

    davenn

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    which specific one .... black holes are being discovered all the time

    the really big ones are in the cores of galaxies and the whole galaxy is slowly being "consumed" by the blackhole

    you need to go back to your source of info and see if there is more info available
    you havent given too much to go on :)

    cheers
    Dave

    EDIT..... ok going on what you did give google retrieved masses of links to a Berkeley discovery in early december 2011

    but I stress again optical images are not likely to be there.

    I searched using .... black hole discovery in 2011 by berkeley university
     
    Last edited: Feb 8, 2012
  6. Feb 8, 2012 #5

    Chronos

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  7. Feb 8, 2012 #6
    Have they ever released the x-ray images of any black holes? If a star was being eaten, we would be able to see the star until it crossed the event horizon right?
     
  8. Feb 8, 2012 #7

    davenn

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    not at the distances those galaxy eating black holes are at. the density of the stars at the centre of virtually any galaxy, even closer ones, is such that individual stars near the core are blended into a single bright patch of light.... we just dont have the resolution capabilities to see much of individual stars in a core of a galaxy.
    heck we can hardly see the core of our own galaxy cus of all the dust and gas etc in the road. and thats only ~ 50,000 lightyears from us. how much more difficult for galaxies that are millions or 100's of millions of lightyears away ?!!

    And on top of that Xray imaging resolution is much lower than visible light imaging with current technology.

    here's a hi resolution pic of JUST the core of one of my fav galaxies NGC253 (imaged by the ESO group)
    see how the centre core is just a bright mass no individual stars visible
    this galaxy is a mere 11 million ly away!!

    attachment.php?attachmentid=43684&stc=1&d=1328763773.jpg

    cheers
    Dave
     

    Attached Files:

  9. Feb 8, 2012 #8

    davenn

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    if you followed that wiki link I gave you earlier you would see an X-ray image


    Dave
     
  10. Feb 8, 2012 #9

    davenn

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    just for another example ... M104, the Sombrero Galaxy, 28million ly distant
    just the core area again...

    attachment.php?attachmentid=43686&stc=1&d=1328764554.jpg

    again the core is just a bright mass with no individual stars resolved

    hopefully thats enough to convince you that you are not going to directly see the destruction of stars falling into a black hole :smile:

    cheers
    Dave
     

    Attached Files:

  11. Feb 9, 2012 #10
    The following website has both a simulation of the black hole swallowing a star and the actual visual data that led to the discovery.

    The following website shows us the many ways in which the haze from the Milky Way's galactic center can be overcome so that its individual stars become visible. In fact, the existence of the black hole at our galaxy's center which was only once theorized has been confirmed via the meticulous observation of stars that are in orbit around it using infra red. The photos of those high-velocity central stars in orbit around our galaxy's back hole are readily available on the internet.


     
    Last edited: Feb 9, 2012
  12. Feb 9, 2012 #11
    ^ Everyone. As always you guys rock.
     
  13. Feb 9, 2012 #12

    davenn

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    as I have been trying to impress upon the OP throughout my posts, no its not visual (optical) !! it was done at radio and xray wavelengths




    Dave
     
  14. Feb 9, 2012 #13
    Ya I just wanted to see the actual stock. What the people working on the project saw. It helped reduce a suspicion that I was in a simulation and quantum physics is just a mask so I don't find any "tells"; so I stay blissfully unaware that im being harvested by robots :p This delusion also included all of you being apart of the system cause all the "physicsts" are the "agents". Lol. Helping to keep us in line, with fake science. Black holes were fake, and the christians were right the world is like 60 years old. Ha, weird huh huh.

    No need to delete my post, or reply to it. Not trying to start overly speculative conversation. Just thought it was kinda funny how paranoid I can get especially when i take my medication.

    http://www.simulation-argument.com/simulation.html

    Peer reviewed source.
     
  15. Feb 9, 2012 #14
    Creepay.
     
  16. Feb 9, 2012 #15


    At the risk of being pedantic, please note that I am not claiming that a black hole is directly visible or that the detection of the OPED black hole star swallowing phenomenon was not done via X-ray or radio wavelengths. Please read my post and you will see that I am referring to the stars near the galaxy centers being visible in infra red as opposed to being completely hidden behind a totally visually impenetrable haze. Sorry if I gave another impression. Infrared detection of such stars is a visual detection just as detecting an enemy in the dark via infra red is. Visual as opposed to olfactory, auditory, gustatory, or tactile dectection.







     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 5, 2017
  17. Feb 9, 2012 #16

    DaveC426913

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    To be pedantic, the star will not near the EH as a star. Long before it gets near the BH, the star will be torn apart by tidal forces into a stream gas spiraling down to the BH (this is what you see in all the artist renditions), raging brightly in all EM frequencies (but especially X-rays) as it falls and compresses.
     
  18. Feb 10, 2012 #17

    davenn

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    Thanks Dave,

    which was exactly what I was describing with the Cygnus X-1 black hole in my first post :)

    cheers
    Dave
     
  19. Feb 10, 2012 #18
    It isn't inherently always impossible to see a star being ripped apart in visible light since there is nothing that prevents such visible light from reaching us during that process. That is unless distance makes the event too dim or dust intervenes. But otherwise a person nearby would see the whole thing unraveling in all its glory in VS as well.


    Please note that it is essential to separate accretion disk radiation and the star itself as it is being cannibalized. They are two totally temporally different and qualitatively separate phenomenon. One involves radiation produced by the star's material accelerated around the BH and producing GR and X-Ray radiation .The other observable phenomenon involves the star itself as it gradually loses material and luminosity until it final disappears and is no longer visible in any LS.

    As long as the star itself hasn't gone beyond the BHEH its light will reach us. If it doesn't reach us or reaches us too faintly during the process it isn't because of BH gravity prevents it or because the visible light spectrum is being nullified during the event. It is because of extreme distance or intervening dust as the article below points out .


    .
    Here are images in visible light after the X-rays were detected.

    .




     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2012
  20. Feb 10, 2012 #19

    DaveC426913

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    Don't know anyone who suggested that to be the case.
     
  21. Feb 11, 2012 #20
    This is an old article but it has an interesting diagram that shows 20 confirmed black hole binaries which compares the size of black hole/accretion disc with the companion star-

    http://mintaka.sdsu.edu/faculty/orosz/web/ [Broken]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 5, 2017
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