Rotation period vs. mass of planets in solar system

In summary, the conversation discusses the relationship between a planet's weight and its rotation speed. The participants suggest that the initial rotation speeds may differ, causing the current speeds to have varying relationships. They also mention a post by starz9 that was deleted for not meeting forum guidelines, and one participant, James J. Wood, Sr., shares that he received an explanation for the deletion from Mr. Russ Watters. Ultimately, the conversation ends with James J. Wood, Sr. expressing respect for the staff's decision, but wishing for more explanation.
  • #1
pixel01
688
1
Hi all,

I just realize that for most of the planets in our solar system, the heavier the planet, the faster it rotates around its axis. Do you think there may be any reasons for that?
 
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  • #2
Guess:
If all planets started out rotating fast, then the smaller planets and also closer to the sun would be affected more by tidal friction than the more distant large planets.
 
  • #3
mathman said:
Guess:
If all planets started out rotating fast, then the smaller planets and also closer to the sun would be affected more by tidal friction than the more distant large planets.

So it won't explain why Uranus or Neptune rotates slower than Jupiter or Saturn.
 
  • #4
If the initial rotation speeds were different, then the current speeds don't have to have an exact relationship.
 
  • #5
Where is the post by starz9? I was reading it.
 
  • #6
pixel01 said:
Where is the post by starz9? I was reading it.
It was deleted for not meeting forum guidelines.
 
  • #7
russ_watters said:
It was deleted for not meeting forum guidelines.

Thanks. I was just about to ask if it could be deleted.
 
  • #8
When my post was deleted I thought it was due to my inclusion of my book title and a link to my web site, so I eliminated those items and tried to repost unsuccessfully.

Mr. Russ Watters was kind enough to send me an email explaining why the Forum was of the view my post did not adhere to your rules. DH makes the view unanimous.
It is your right to decide what you like and what you do not. I respect that. However, I would have been much more impressed if the staff could have shown where I'm wrong.
Best wished and Bye, James J. Wood, Sr.
 

Related to Rotation period vs. mass of planets in solar system

1. What is the relationship between rotation period and mass of planets in the solar system?

The rotation period of a planet is directly related to its mass, with larger planets typically having longer rotation periods. This is due to the fact that the force of gravity is stronger on larger planets, causing them to rotate slower than smaller planets.

2. How does the rotation period of Earth compare to other planets in our solar system?

Earth has a rotation period of 24 hours, which is relatively short compared to other planets in our solar system. For example, Jupiter has a rotation period of about 10 hours, while Venus has an incredibly slow rotation period of 243 Earth days.

3. Is there a correlation between a planet's mass and its rotation period?

Yes, there is a correlation between a planet's mass and its rotation period. As mentioned before, larger planets tend to have longer rotation periods due to the stronger force of gravity. However, there are other factors that can affect a planet's rotation period, such as its distance from the sun and its composition.

4. Can the rotation period of a planet change over time?

Yes, the rotation period of a planet can change over time due to various factors. For example, Earth's rotation period has slowed down over time due to tidal friction caused by the moon. Additionally, external forces such as collisions with other objects can also affect a planet's rotation.

5. How does the rotation period of a planet affect its climate and weather patterns?

The rotation period of a planet can have a significant impact on its climate and weather patterns. For example, a longer rotation period can lead to more extreme temperature differences between day and night, while a shorter rotation period can result in a milder climate. The rotation period also affects the direction and strength of winds and ocean currents on a planet, which can influence its weather patterns.

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