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Rules for Female Teachers (1915)

  1. Jul 8, 2014 #1

    George Jones

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    Source: the website of University of Toronto's The Ontario Institute for Studies in Education,

    http://fcis.oise.utoronto.ca/~daniel_sch/assignment1/1915rules.html
     
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  3. Jul 8, 2014 #2

    Evo

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    Crazy.
     
  4. Jul 8, 2014 #3

    Borek

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    Quite clear. And it allows having sex, drinking, and smoking pot while riding a bike with other woman, so it is not that restrictive.
     
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2014
  5. Jul 8, 2014 #4

    Doc Al

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    Makes sense to me.
     
  6. Jul 8, 2014 #5

    OmCheeto

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    :rofl:

    What on earth was going on in the ice cream stores back then?

    (google google google)

    Erased from history....

    Very suspicious....
     
  7. Jul 8, 2014 #6

    Monique

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    Suspicious indeed, something abhorrent must have happened at ice cream stores for Google to erase it from their search history.
     
  8. Jul 8, 2014 #7

    AlephZero

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    Well, they were progressive enough to allow female teachers at all.

    Employment restrictions on marriage were quite common (not only in teaching), and were logical when married women had no legal or financial status independent of their husbands, and therefore probably couldn't sign a contract of employment, or be paid for working.
     
  9. Jul 8, 2014 #8

    collinsmark

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    If I correctly recall stories from my grandmother, along with books and movies, ice cream parlors of that time and location (mid-west, United States) functioned as a social gathering place for young adults: a place where young people could hang out, so to speak.

    Unlike ice cream stores of today, where one (1) stands in line, (2) orders product, and (3) gets the hell out, ice cream parlors back then were a place for gathering for an extended period of time, socializing and mingling with other members of one's age group.

    There's no particular "ill repute" about that. I'm guessing the teachers just weren't allowed to "hang-out" with gangs of youngsters.

    [Edit: by the way, I was not able to find the original source of the material. The website quoted in the OP seems to have a quote reprinted from the Nebraska Farmer, September 1999, but the link appears to be broken.]
     
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2014
  10. Jul 8, 2014 #9

    StatGuy2000

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    I'm assuming you're being sarcastic here. :P

    As for the particular restrictions on female teachers (assuming the authenticity of the document, which may be doubtful), I find it incredible just how much society has changed within a century with respect to female employment. I live in a day and age where it's perfectly normal for women to work in just about any profession -- to imagine a time not so long ago where women were effectively barred from most workplaces and didn't even have the right to vote is just mind-boggling to me.
     
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2014
  11. Jul 8, 2014 #10

    phinds

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    Sounds a lot like the Arab countries today, just not quite as restrictive.
     
  12. Jul 8, 2014 #11

    russ_watters

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  13. Jul 8, 2014 #12

    OmCheeto

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    hmmm.... Haven't they been complaining about our "bad influence"?


    That's how all this western decadence got started.

    girls eating sweets.....
     
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2014
  14. Jul 8, 2014 #13

    Evo

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    Here's some history from PBS.

    http://www.pbs.org/onlyateacher/timeline.html
     
  15. Jul 8, 2014 #14

    OmCheeto

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    hmmmm......

    Not sure if I ever mentioned the fact that I have a web page devoted to a certain brand of boat made in Gray's Harbor Washington, that ceased production in about 1960. I did a lot of web surfing to get a little bit of information. Later, I went to the library in Aberdeen, and found more information. Later on still, I went to the birthday party of the guy who built my boats. He, and his family, told me more than I can reveal. :bugeye:

    Moral of the story?

    Sometimes, you have to go to the library, and/or museum. And sometimes, well, let's just say they told me that grandpa* was found floating, face down, in Gray's Harbor one night, for no good reason..... :eek:

    *Grandpa started the business in the early 40's. The guy who built my boats, was his son, and was 90 when I met him, in 2005.
     
  16. Jul 8, 2014 #15
    Part of the employment contract - suspicious.

    Each school board, district, jurisdiction would have to have had local considerations, so being part of ' education history' from places such as Ontrario, Iowa, Alaska, New Zealand that have nothing to do with one another makes the listing dubious.

    Quaint though.
     
  17. Jul 8, 2014 #16

    Curious3141

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    Those rules might have tempted some women to carry out part of the last one quite overzealously.

    The room? Let's "warm up" the whole damned school! :devil:
     
  18. Jul 8, 2014 #17

    Evo

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    In many cases the entire *school* was a single room.

    Has no one read the actual historical reference I posted?
     
  19. Jul 8, 2014 #18

    russ_watters

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    Would be nice to actually see the source instead of being told about it second-hand from a comment in a message board.

    As Snopes says, it would be very odd to put a date in the rules, but very convenient for labeling the chain-letter to help spread it.
     
  20. Jul 8, 2014 #19

    russ_watters

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    I did, but it doesn't contain a copy of the linked rules or show much similarity to them.
     
  21. Jul 8, 2014 #20

    Evo

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    Of course not, that's because they're the real thing, that's the point, they're *real*. I thought we were trying to determine what the real rules were.

    I can imagine that religious schools may have even stricter rules than public schools, but what I posted was what was being normally followed at that time.
     
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