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Scientific explanation of a chip pan fire + water

  1. Nov 21, 2006 #1
    Ok, I know what happens (big fireball :surprised: ) when you add water to a chip pan fire, but I'd really appreciate it if you guys (and gals) helped me out with SCIENTIFICALLY describing WHY adding water to the pan causes the fireball. It must contain words like "immiscible" and so on...

    Thanks in advance!

    (Quick reply appreciated, getting sleepy :zzz: :biggrin: )
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 21, 2006 #2

    Hootenanny

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    Leave our homework till the night before did we? :rolleyes:
     
  4. Nov 21, 2006 #3
    Better than I usually do :tongue2:

    It's normally the lesson before it's due!

    I have study support before it's due, so time isn't an issue. I just really don't get it...

    It wasn't a great idea to explain it to the class when you're making fireballs! :biggrin:
     
  5. Nov 21, 2006 #4

    Hootenanny

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    Google is your best friend, I found a document with the bare bones of an answer in with 20 seconds... :tongue2:
     
  6. Nov 21, 2006 #5
    Atleast give me the search terms you used please, I have searched (I found this site through searching), but even the Wikipedia article I read doesn't clear up my questions...
     
  7. Nov 21, 2006 #6

    Hootenanny

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    How about, "chip pan fire water" ? :biggrin:
     
  8. Nov 21, 2006 #7
    Tried that, looked at the top ten results, they are all pretty much the same thing. "Don't do it, it will make a fireball" is all you get. I know it makes a fireball, I need to know HOW and WHY it makes a fireball.

    Thanks.
     
  9. Nov 21, 2006 #8

    Hootenanny

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    How about trying the second page? I could give you some suggestive hints if you prefer?
     
  10. Nov 21, 2006 #9
    Please, I only need a very brief description to set me going, I don't a 3000 word essay or anything. A sentence or 2 will do aslong it's to the point and then I can expand on that.

    Thanks.
     
  11. Nov 21, 2006 #10

    Hootenanny

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    Answer these questions and you should be able to explain why water should not be poured on water?

    1. What type of compound is chip fat / vegetable oil?
    2. Are these compounds miscible in water?
    3. What is the relative density between these compounds and water?
     
  12. Nov 21, 2006 #11
    1. No idea?
    2. No, they are hydrophobic.
    3. Water is denser? (so it sinks?)
     
  13. Nov 21, 2006 #12

    Hootenanny

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    Some further questions;

    1. Which is generally higher - the boiling point of water or the ignition point of a fat?
    2. What will happen if large volumes of water boil (and turn to steam) while in the fat / hydrocarbon?
     
  14. Nov 21, 2006 #13

    Hootenanny

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    Some further questions;

    1. Which is generally higher - the boiling point of water or the ignition point of a fat?
    2. What will happen if large volumes of water boil (and turn to steam) while in the fat / hydrocarbon?
     
  15. Nov 21, 2006 #14

    Hootenanny

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    Some further questions;

    1. Which is generally higher - the boiling point of water or the ignition point of a fat?
    2. What will happen if large volumes of water boil (and turn to steam) while in the fat / hydrocarbon?
     
  16. Nov 21, 2006 #15

    Hootenanny

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    Some further questions;

    1. Which is generally higher - the boiling point of water or the ignition point of a fat?
    2. What will happen if large volumes of water boil (and turn to steam) while in the fat / hydrocarbon?
     
  17. Nov 21, 2006 #16

    Hootenanny

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    Some further questions;

    1. Which is generally higher - the boiling point of water or the ignition point of a fat?
    2. What will happen if large volumes of water boil (and turn to steam) while in the fat / hydrocarbon?
     
  18. Nov 21, 2006 #17

    Hootenanny

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    Some further questions;

    1. Which is generally higher - the boiling point of water or the ignition point of a fat?
    2. What will happen if large volumes of water boil (and turn to steam) while in the fat / hydrocarbon?
     
  19. Nov 21, 2006 #18

    Hootenanny

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    Some further questions;

    1. Which is generally higher - the boiling point of water or the ignition point of a fat?
    2. What will happen if large volumes of water boil (and turn to steam) while in the fat / hydrocarbon?
     
  20. Nov 21, 2006 #19
    Got it after about an hour of "Googling" trying to find the right thing. Found an 18 page .pdf which explained things very nicely :rofl:
     
  21. Nov 21, 2006 #20

    Hootenanny

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    Some further questions;

    1. Generally, which is higher; the boiling point of water or the ignition point of fat?
    2. What would happen in large volumes of water boiled (and turned into steam) inside a bowl full of fat?
     
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