Simple Physics Problem: Finding c in a Particle's Position Equation at t = 3.0 s

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In summary, a 1.2 kg particle is moving along the x-axis with a variable force propelling it. Its position is given by x = 3.0 m + (4.0 m/s)t + ct2 - (2.2 m/s3)t3, where c is a constant. At t = 3.0 s, the force on the particle is 36 N in the negative direction of the axis. To solve for c, the equation a = 2c - 13.2t is used and when t is substituted with 3, it becomes 2c - 39.6. Using the equation F=MA, 36 = (1.2)(2c-39
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AnkhUNC
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Homework Statement



A 1.2 kg particle moves along an x axis, being propelled by a variable force directed along that axis. Its position is given by x = 3.0 m + (4.0 m/s)t + ct2 - (2.2 m/s3)t3, with x in meters and t in seconds. The factor c is a constant. At t = 3.0 s, the force on the particle has a magnitude of 36 N and is in the negative direction of the axis. What is c?

Homework Equations





The Attempt at a Solution




I double dif. to get a = 2c-13.2t and plug in t = 3 => 2c-39.6 right? F=MA so its 36 = (1.2)(2c-39.6)?
 
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So far, so good...
 
  • #3


Your attempt at a solution is on the right track. However, there are a few things to note:

1. The equation for acceleration should be a = 2c - 6.6t. This can be obtained by taking the second derivative of the position equation with respect to time.

2. The force on the particle is given by F = ma, where m is the mass of the particle and a is the acceleration. So the correct equation should be 36 = (1.2)(2c - 6.6t).

3. Substituting t = 3 into the equation will give you an equation with two unknowns (c and t). You will need to solve for c by using another equation or method.

4. Remember to include units in your calculations. In this case, the units for mass are kg, for acceleration are m/s^2, and for force are N.

Overall, your approach is correct, but you will need to make some adjustments and use additional equations to solve for c.
 

Related to Simple Physics Problem: Finding c in a Particle's Position Equation at t = 3.0 s

1. What is the definition of "simple physics problem?"

Simple physics problems are basic, fundamental problems in physics that do not involve complex calculations or advanced concepts.

2. What are some examples of simple physics problems?

Examples of simple physics problems include calculating the speed of an object, determining the force needed to move an object, and understanding basic principles such as Newton's laws of motion.

3. How do I solve a simple physics problem?

To solve a simple physics problem, you must first identify what is given and what you are trying to find. Then, you can use basic equations and principles to solve for the unknown variable.

4. What is the importance of understanding simple physics problems?

Understanding simple physics problems is crucial for building a strong foundation in physics and being able to apply these principles to more complex problems. It also helps in understanding the world around us and how things work.

5. What resources can I use to practice solving simple physics problems?

There are many resources available for practicing and improving your skills in solving simple physics problems. These include textbooks, online tutorials, and practice problems with solutions. It is also helpful to work with a study group or seek guidance from a physics tutor.

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