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Simple quantum mechanics operator question

  1. Jan 31, 2012 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data

    What physical quantity is represented by the operator [itex]i\bar{h}∂/∂t[/itex]

    2. Relevant equations

    [itex]i\bar{h}∂/∂t[/itex]


    3. The attempt at a solution

    It's a one mark question, I just have no idea what it is and I can't find it in my notes D:.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 31, 2012 #2

    Dick

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    Look at the Schrodinger equation.
     
  4. Jan 31, 2012 #3
    Is it total energy for a free particle?
     
  5. Jan 31, 2012 #4

    Dick

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    The Schrodinger equation applies to more than just free particles. But yes, it's the Hamiltonian. So I think it would be fair to call it the energy.
     
  6. Jan 31, 2012 #5
    Hmm, I have the hamiltonian written down here as

    [itex]\hat{H}=-\frac{\bar{h}^{2}}{2m}∂^{2}/∂x^{2}[/itex]


    So that is also equal to [itex]i\bar{h}∂/∂t[/itex] ?

    [itex]\vec{}[/itex]
     
  7. Jan 31, 2012 #6

    Dick

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    That's the Hamiltonian for a free particle in one dimension. It's a special case. Your operator is the Hamiltonian even in cases where that is not the Hamiltonian.
     
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