Solving a Solubility Problem: Ba(NO3)2 Crystallisation

  • Thread starter elliotyang
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That is 5g, so 100g/300g H20 will have 5g Ba(NO3)2 dissolved and 4g of H20 on the surface. In summary, if one starts with 100g of Ba(NO3)2 and makes a saturated solution in water at 100ºC, and then cools it to 0ºC, 5g of Ba(NO3)2 will be dissolved and 4g of H20 will be on the surface of the crystals.
  • #1
elliotyang
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Homework Statement


Given solubility of Ba(NO3)2 is
34g/100 H20 at 100oC
5g/100g of H20 AT 0oC
if one starts with 100g of (BaNO3)2 and make a saturated solution in water at 100oC, and then cooled to 0oC, how much Ba(NO3)2 is crystallised out of solution?
The resultant crystals carry along with them on surface 4g of H20 per 100g of the crystals.




Homework Equations


input=output


The Attempt at a Solution


Initial the concentrated solution would be 100g/300g H20 if i do not calculate wrongly.
then how should i proceed?
 
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  • #2
You have 100g/300g initially. Once you cool down the solution - amount of water won't change, amount of dissolved salt will. How much salt will be dissolved in 300g of water at 0ºC?
 
  • #3


One possible approach to solving this problem would be to first calculate the amount of Ba(NO3)2 that would be dissolved in 100g of water at 100oC, using the given solubility of 34g/100g. This would result in a saturated solution of 34g Ba(NO3)2 in 100g of water.

Next, we can use the principle of input=output to determine the amount of Ba(NO3)2 that will crystallize out of solution as it cools to 0oC. Since the solubility at 0oC is 5g/100g, we can expect that 5g of Ba(NO3)2 will remain dissolved in the cooled solution, leaving 29g to crystallize out.

Since the resultant crystals carry along 4g of water per 100g of crystals, we can calculate the total mass of the crystals by dividing the amount of Ba(NO3)2 that crystallized out (29g) by the percentage of Ba(NO3)2 in the crystals (100g/300g = 1/3). This gives us a total mass of 87g of crystals.

To determine the amount of Ba(NO3)2 in these crystals, we can use the percentage of Ba(NO3)2 in the crystals (1/3) and the total mass of the crystals (87g) to find that the crystals contain 29g of Ba(NO3)2.

Therefore, out of the initial 100g of Ba(NO3)2, 29g will crystallize out of solution as it cools to 0oC, leaving a solution with 5g of Ba(NO3)2 in 100g of water. The remaining 29g of Ba(NO3)2 will be in the form of crystals, along with 4g of water per 100g of crystals.
 

Related to Solving a Solubility Problem: Ba(NO3)2 Crystallisation

1. How do you determine the solubility of Ba(NO3)2?

To determine the solubility of Ba(NO3)2, you will need to conduct experiments and measure the amount of the compound that can dissolve in a given solvent at different temperatures. This data can then be used to create a solubility curve.

2. What factors affect the solubility of Ba(NO3)2?

The solubility of Ba(NO3)2 can be affected by temperature, pressure, and the presence of other substances in the solution. In general, increasing temperature and pressure can increase solubility, while the presence of other substances can either increase or decrease solubility depending on their chemical properties.

3. How does the crystallization process work for Ba(NO3)2?

Crystallization is the process of separating a solute from a solution by cooling or evaporating the solvent. In the case of Ba(NO3)2, as the solvent is removed, the concentration of the compound in the solution increases until it reaches its saturation point and begins to form crystals. These crystals can then be separated from the remaining solution.

4. What is the purpose of using a solubility curve in solving a solubility problem?

A solubility curve is a graph that shows the relationship between the solubility of a compound and temperature. It is useful in solving solubility problems because it allows you to determine the maximum amount of a compound that can dissolve in a given solvent at a specific temperature. This information can be used to predict how much of the compound will crystallize out of solution at a certain temperature.

5. How can the solubility of Ba(NO3)2 be increased?

The solubility of Ba(NO3)2 can be increased by increasing the temperature or pressure, or by adding a substance that can disrupt the crystal lattice of the compound and increase its solubility. Examples of such substances include surfactants or other salts that can form ion-dipole interactions with Ba(NO3)2.

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