Special Request: Deadline 2PM EST 9/25/2013

  • #1
FlexGunship
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Main Question or Discussion Point

I've been selected for my company's leadership program. I have a one-on-one coaching session today. I think I've gotten the first time slot out of the 25 people in the program (world wide).

We're encouraged to talk about our goals and our recent "round 2" in-depth MBTI results. What are some other topics I might bring up? I'm drawing a blank.

I'm a senior controls engineer specializing in motion and mechatronics. My MBTI type is ENTJ. I'm 28. My short term goals are pretty standard, there's no manager for our engineering group, so I'd like to fill that role. I've spent a total of 5 years in project leadership and 3 years in functional leadership. My long term goals (like everyone else's, I'm sure) is to be an executive. I realize it's impractical, but it's a goal.

We meet at 2 (in about an hour). Just got the invite. Any suggestions?
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
drizzle
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Congrats Flex. :smile:
 
  • #3
AlephZero
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My long term goals (like everyone else's, I'm sure) is to be an executive.
Don't make assumptions without evidence :smile:

I figured out years ago that I can do "management" in my sleep, but it was so boring I probably wouldn't want to wake up again.

Here's a question to think about: Suppose you were promoted 2 or 3 levels up the management hierarchy from your current position, and given the power and the budget to change whatever you liked in the company. What would you do?

And a follow-up question: if you got the same job, but with no special executive powers and no reorganization budget, then what would you do?
 
  • #4
FlexGunship
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Congrats Flex. :smile:
Thanks.

Don't make assumptions without evidence :smile:

I figured out years ago that I can do "management" in my sleep, but it was so boring I probably wouldn't want to wake up again.

Here's a question to think about: Suppose you were promoted 2 or 3 levels up the management hierarchy from your current position, and given the power and the budget to change whatever you liked in the company. What would you do?

And a follow-up question: if you got the same job, but with no special executive powers and no reorganization budget, then what would you do?
At this point, if I were promoted a few levels up, the biggest change I would make would be to co-locate marketing and project management. They're only a couple hundred feet from each other, but they might as well be on different continents when it comes to program alignment.

Well, anyway, I didn't get a chance to use this during the conversation. But we found plenty to talk about. We mostly talked about skills that I lack and certain shortcomings in perspective. True to classic "coaching" form she put all of my questions back to me as questions. I have a few action items and plenty to think about.

If there are any __F_ (MBTI types with a feeling component) out there, let me know. I'm supposed to talk to a feeler; don't worry, she made me promise not to hurt any feelings!
 
  • #5
AlephZero
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At this point, if I were promoted a few levels up, the biggest change I would make would be to co-locate marketing and project management. They're only a couple hundred feet from each other, but they might as well be on different continents when it comes to program alignment.
That could be fun. Once they are in the same room together, they might learn how to to throw real rocks at each other instead of just sending emails. Make sure they all leave their guns and knives at the door.... :biggrin:

Seriously though, it seems like you got something useful from it - and that's the main thing.
 
  • #6
FlexGunship
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Seriously though, it seems like you got something useful from it - and that's the main thing.
Definitely. I think in any of those types of sessions (whether they be personal coaching, leadership coaching, general emotional therapy, etc) you ultimately end up being the source of your solutions. Ask a question, and you get one back. It's a common tactic, but it works well. I found myself saying things that seemed clear in my head and then finding that those things really weren't; they were either convoluted or really undeveloped.

At one point, I said something to the effect of: "but why am I expected to pat someone on the back for spending a week coming to the wrong answer?" And after saying it aloud, I realized how silly that really is. Pragmatically, you often have to follow a problem to completion before you realize it wasn't the right track. But on a personal level, it's a really deflating experience to begin with and casual dismissal makes it all the more demotivating.

So, just an example...
 
  • #7
jhae2.718
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Controls engineers FTW!
 
  • #8
lisab
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I think you'll do just fine talking with "feelers". You've never struck me as someone who is oblivious to others' feelings, in fact I suspect you have very good people skills.

Congrats :smile:.
 

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