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Strong and weak interactions particles

  1. Aug 13, 2012 #1
    Does anybody could help me to state if the following particles experience strong interactions, weak interactions, both interactions or neither of the two interactions? This is what I think:

    electron = strong interactions and weak interactions
    boson = weak interactions
    down quark = strong interactions and weak interactions
    gluon = strong interactions
    anti muon neutrino = weak interactions
    up antiquark = strong interactions

    Thanks!
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 13, 2012 #2

    Meir Achuz

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    electron-weak W
    boson-S and W
    down quark=S and W
    gluon- S
    any neutrino W
    any quark or antiqurk S and W
     
  4. Aug 14, 2012 #3
    Thanks! I am just not sure that bosons are a quanta that experiences also in strong interactions. I thought that because they have a mass of about 80 or 90 GeV/c2, which is just less than the strength of weak interactions, they are emitted only during weak interactions. And because the strength of strong interactions is instead 10 times greater (about 1015 GeV), according with the theory of quantum chromodynamics during strong interactions it is involved the emissions of gluons, which is indeed the quanta for strong interactions.
     
  5. Aug 14, 2012 #4
    Of course it depends on what type of boson you are talking about but if we only include standard model higgs bosons then it does not interact with the strong force. This is because the higgs transforms as a singlet under SU(3) and therefore does not interact with gluons.
     
  6. Aug 15, 2012 #5

    Meir Achuz

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    "Boson" is a general term that includes any integral spin particle, so a Boson could be a gluon, pion, or a myriad of other particless.
     
  7. Aug 15, 2012 #6
    Right, I was just trying to be specific because if we include pions as well then these bosons can interact electromagnetically, it all depends on how the Boson transforms under the appropriate symmery group.

    There are also "gauge bosons" which are the "force carriers". Orion78 was there a specific particle/Boston you are interested in?
     
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