Suitable lessons in math and physics

In summary: There is no one specific book that you need to read for oversize. You could read any textbook that is recommended for your grade level.
  • #1
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School is almost over and Summer is almost in the doors, Next year I'm in year 12, but what I'm thinking is to study in summer better than wasting it because next year is an important year to go through college.
Looking to go to the faculaty of engineer"(mechanical engineer) , I need some lessons to be tough in . So I hope some advice in giving me the suitable lessons in math and physics.

Thank You.
 
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  • #2


You're only in 12th grade. Go take some stuff apart. Build a bicycle. Learn how to weld. Have fun. Learn calculus in the fall.
 
  • #3


mooktank said:
You're only in 12th grade. Go take some stuff apart. Build a bicycle. Learn how to weld. Have fun. Learn calculus in the fall.

Thank You, I'm against what you said.
 
  • #4


Actually I think Mooktank has some pretty good advice. Engineering isn't just theory. Sometimes you have to get your hands dirty to understand the principles at work.

When I was a teenager, my friends and I used to build and race radio-controlled cars. I learned a lot more about electronics from that hobby than I did from formal classes, at least until I got up to senior level physics courses.
 
  • #5


Just read some books to get familiar with it. But like the last two said, go and have fun.

I was in the same position for a while...read 1 book. Didn't understand a thing. Then finally got into the class. I aced it.
 
  • #6


Choppy said:
Actually I think Mooktank has some pretty good advice. Engineering isn't just theory. Sometimes you have to get your hands dirty to understand the principles at work.
.
I see, but my year 12 freinds are facing lot of toture in understanding Math and physics.
Infact, they always say that if they learned in summer was much better.?
 
  • #7


djeitnstine said:
Just read some books to get familiar with it. But like the last two said, go and have fun.

I was in the same position for a while...read 1 book. Didn't understand a thing. Then finally got into the class. I aced it.

Read 1 book of what ?
 
  • #8


Well, if you really want some suggested reading, a good source might be any of the 12th grade teachers at your school. Just catch them after class, or send them an email, explaining that you're keen to do some reading over the summer, and if they have any textbooks or websites they might suggest.
 
  • #9


Yeah check out the syllabus for next year's work.
 
  • #10


Thank You I will.
 
  • #12


Howers said:
Try Stewart's calculus. That will help you in gr12, and give you a head start on university. Any edition of this book will suffice:

https://www.amazon.com/dp/0534359493/?tag=pfamazon01-20

Please is their any better specific book, to look oversies.
Thank You.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

1. What are some strategies for teaching math and physics effectively?

Some strategies for teaching math and physics effectively include breaking down complex concepts into smaller, more manageable parts, providing real-world examples and applications, integrating hands-on activities and experiments, and incorporating visual aids and technology.

2. How can I make math and physics lessons more interesting and engaging for students?

To make math and physics lessons more interesting and engaging for students, try incorporating interactive activities and games, incorporating real-life scenarios and problems, using multimedia resources, and allowing for student-led discussions and projects.

3. How can I differentiate math and physics lessons for students with different learning styles?

To differentiate math and physics lessons for students with different learning styles, consider providing a variety of learning materials, such as visual aids, hands-on activities, and written explanations. You can also offer different levels of difficulty for assignments and allow for flexible groupings and discussions.

4. What are some common misconceptions students have about math and physics?

Some common misconceptions students have about math and physics include the belief that these subjects are only for "smart" people, that they are not relevant to everyday life, and that there is only one correct way to solve a problem. It is important to address these misconceptions and show students the practical applications and different problem-solving strategies in these subjects.

5. How can I help struggling students improve in math and physics?

To help struggling students improve in math and physics, offer additional support outside of class, such as one-on-one tutoring or online resources. Encourage students to ask questions and seek help when needed, and provide extra practice and review materials. It is also important to provide positive reinforcement and encouragement to boost their confidence in these subjects.

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