The birthday problem concept question

  • Thread starter maiad
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  • #1
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Main Question or Discussion Point

Let A(i) be the event that the first ith person have different birthdays for i=1,2,3...,n.
We note that A(i+1) is a subset of Ai such that Ai(A(i+1))= A(i+1)

I wonder why A(i+1) is a subset of Ai. If the first 3 people have no birthdays in common, shouldn't that also mean the first 2 people doesn't either? By that logic, shouldnt Ai be the subset of A(i+1)?
 
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Answers and Replies

  • #2
mathman
Science Advisor
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Your reasoning is correct up to the conclusion. Ai includes i+1 people who have same birthday as one of the first i, as well as all of A(i+1), therefore Ai is the bigger set.
 

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