The end of blaring TV commercials

  1. Ivan Seeking

    Ivan Seeking 12,521
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    http://www.dailytech.com/FCC+Addresses+Obnoxious+Volume+of+TV+Commercials/article23520.htm

    YAY!!!! I guess this means I won't have to build that smart-sound device I've been planning to make for the last twenty years. This is just another example of the fact that procrastination pays. After only twenty years, the problem took care of itself.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Borg

    Borg 1,119
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    I'll be glad to see this take effect. My wife is very quick to turn the volumn down during commercials but always 'forgets' to turn it back up. Of course, this doesn't happen when her shows are on. :rolleyes:

    Ivan, maybe you could create a phone tool to nuke telemarketers instead? I'm sure that nobody would mind if you take that request too literally. :tongue:
     
  4. Ivan Seeking

    Ivan Seeking 12,521
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    I never realized that we're married to the same woman.

    I'll get right on that one! Check back in about twenty years and I should have something.
     
  5. Just about every TV I have owned for the last 10 years has done this automatically. Still, it's about time.
     
  6. turbo

    turbo 7,366
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    I hope this comes true. (I have doubts, given the crappy levels of regulation that we see in other areas.) I don't watch too much TV aside from the local and national news, but commercials give me a headache. Most of them are about drugs that can kill you, cause liver failure, or make body-parts fall off, but they are all 'way too loud.
     
  7. Ivan Seeking

    Ivan Seeking 12,521
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    I've never seen a smart sound system that actually worked. And it wasn't an option on the new TVs we considered or the one we bought [I assume because they don't work?].

    Anyway, mine would have worked. :biggrin:
     
  8. Hepth

    Hepth 499
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    I always wondered, at least in the last 5-10 years, if the majority of the difference in volume came from the fact that most programs/movies/etc in digital cable are broadcast in 5.1, and the change in power level comes from the fact that when it goes to a commercial those are usually broadcast in stereo.
    With my sony receiver I notice a difference in the output from a single speaker when i change from 5.1 to 2.0 at the same volume level so I just figured that is what it was for everything else. Maybe I'm wrong.
     
  9. Evo

    Staff: Mentor

    I had been reading about this and was really getting tired of having to turn the sound down or off during commercials.

    Aaargh, not until 12-2012????
     
  10. rhody

    rhody 765
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    Don't worry Evo, you have this to look forward to, lol:
    Rhody... :redface:
     
  11. Ivan Seeking

    Ivan Seeking 12,521
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    Holy cow! I didn't think about that. Talk about a sneaky trick.
     
  12. Once that volume goes down, people won't be able to hear the commercials from the toilet anymore and will stop buying fake alligator purses with 3 easy payments. It will cause immediate economic collapse. The Mayans knew this.
     
  13. LURCH

    LURCH 2,512
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    I've been hearing about this legislation for some time, and I really have my doubts that it can make any real difference. The people recording the commercials don't know what levels the studios are using to record their programs, and certainly can't afford to record at different levels for each TV show during which their commercial might air. So, they will just record at the loudest level they can, to make sure their commercial is not quieter than the hsow.

    I just don't think there is any way this could be done, and I also don't see any way this law could be enforced.
     
  14. turbo

    turbo 7,366
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    The mute button on my TV remote is probably the most worn-out button. Did the Mayans predict this? Huh?!
     
  15. Ivan Seeking

    Ivan Seeking 12,521
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    Just taking a SWAG here, but I don't think the control would be done at the recording level. It will occur at the broadcast level.
     
  16. Evo

    Staff: Mentor

    I had read an article about this last year, the loud commercials are deliberate to get your attention. I don't know if I can find the report, too much junk on the internet.
     
  17. AlephZero

    AlephZero 7,300
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    I'll go with Lurch's argument. There is already a limit to the audio level, namely 100% modulation of the audio part of the transmitted data.

    Human hearing is not a system with a linear response. The people that produce commercials just use the same skill set as the people who produce pop records - they have figured out how to make a given amount of audio power, measured objectively in an electronics lab, sound as loud as possible. The trick is to distort the audio to make it sound "louder", but without making it sound obviously "distorted".

    Most people who want to record their own music discover this phenomenon when they find their CDs don't "sound as loud" as commercial ones, even though the peak levels of the recorded signal look the same on a graph.
     
  18. Astronuc

    Staff: Mentor

    I just hit the mute button and leave the room.

    I thought TiVo developed a way to block commercials, or skip them, which got them in trouble with the commercial TV. A friend used to record shows for later viewing, and he was able to skip or eliminate commercials for a while. Otherwise, we fast forwards through the commercials.

    The best solution is to stop buying anything that is advertised. :biggrin:
     
  19. Ivan Seeking

    Ivan Seeking 12,521
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    How do you know they are always operating at the limit? Perhaps the amplitude is source dependent.
     
  20. Are you saying there's an "AlephZero covers Led Zeppelin" CD out there?
     
  21. Dynamic range compression is used. It essentially increases the volume of the quieter parts. While the peak levels remain the same, the average level is increased dramatically. In the most extreme cases, there is little to no difference in the peak and average levels. This has been a real problem in commercial music for years, resulting in an almost complete lack of dynamic range.

    https://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&...mxt2z4&sig=AHIEtbQm0Vl6H2_ebPt9ADSI7AnoEo0k8w

    http://www.ko4bb.com/Audio/AudioCompression.php
     
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