The Nature of Strong Force: Explaining Its Cause and Effects

In summary, the strong force cannot be fully explained on a fundamental level and is caused by the existence of gluons. This is similar to other fundamental forces such as gravity and weak force. Fundamental physics is based on experiments and models, which are used to make predictions and further understand the universe. While these models may not be directly seen, they are consistent with observed phenomena and can be discarded if they fail to make accurate predictions.
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Please explain how is exactly strong force caused, I've come across various answers but haven't yet received a complete answer. What is the nature of the strong force?
P.S: If this is the wrong thread, Please RE-LOCATE and do not remove please. :)
 
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  • #2
Syed Ammar said:
Please explain how is exactly strong force caused
Physics cannot describe "how" or "why" on a fundamental level. Physics just can give a description that allows to predict measurement results, bi
 
  • #3
This means there's no explanation for how gravity and weak force are caused too?
 
  • #4
Yes. And there is no scientific way such an explanation could look like on a fundamental level.
You can say "gravity is caused by spacetime curvature" (using gravity as an example), but then you can ask "why do we have spacetime curvature?". "The strong force is caused by gluons" - "why do gluons exist?" - just an observation, it is perfectly possible to imagine a universe without the strong force (or with something completely different), this just does not happen to be the universe we live in.
 
  • #5
Is this due to the fact that Fundamental Physics is built up on Imaginary Models and Experimentation?
 
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BTW, Could you explain how the gluons generate this strong force (leaving the formation of sub-atomic particles by the gluons aside).
 
  • #7
Syed Ammar said:
Is this due to the fact that Fundamental Physics is built up on Imaginary Models and Experimentation?
What are "imaginary models"? All of physics is built on experiments. Experiments are the only way to learn something about our universe. Models are made based on those experiments, to predict the results of more experiments.
Syed Ammar said:
BTW, Could you explain how the gluons generate this strong force (leaving the formation of sub-atomic particles by the gluons aside).
Quantum chromodynamics describes the details, the Wikipedia article gives an overview.
 
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I just meant to say that these models have not been seen, just been formulated from results of experiments, and you know what the common perception( Seeing is Believing) is. Thanks a hundred times for that link.. :)
 
  • #9
What do you mean by a model being "seen"? How do you "see" gravity? Models in science make predictions and these predictions are then tested against what we can observe about how the Universe behaves. A model can never been proven, but it can be discarded if it fails to make correct predictions. Naturally, the first step when making a model is to make sure it is consistent with things already observed. It can then be used to make further predictions that may make us discard it if it is not fulfilled or let it live another day if the observation is compatible with the model.
 
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  • #10
Orodruin said:
What do you mean by a model being "seen"? How do you "see" gravity? Models in science make predictions and these predictions are then tested against what we can observe about how the Universe behaves. A model can never been proven, but it can be discarded if it fails to make correct predictions. Naturally, the first step when making a model is to make sure it is consistent with things already observed. It can then be used to make further predictions that may make us discard it if it is not fulfilled or let it live another day if the observation is compatible with the model.

Well, but for quarks and gluons we have been able to "see" leptons and photons... and hadrons and mesons...
 
  • #11
Syed Ammar said:
I just meant to say that these models have not been seen, just been formulated from results of experiments, and you know what the common perception( Seeing is Believing) is. Thanks a hundred times for that link.. :)

Nobody has ever seen wind either - just its results. That isn't a very good reason to disbelieve wind.
 
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1. What is the strong force?

The strong force is one of the four fundamental forces of nature, responsible for holding together the nucleus of an atom. It is the strongest force in nature and is responsible for binding protons and neutrons together to form the nucleus.

2. How does the strong force work?

The strong force works by exchanging particles called gluons between quarks, the building blocks of protons and neutrons. These gluons act like "glue" that holds the quarks together, creating a strong bond between them.

3. What is the cause of the strong force?

The cause of the strong force is the interaction between quarks and gluons. This interaction is mediated by the strong nuclear force, which is carried by gluons. The exact mechanism of this interaction is still being studied and is a topic of ongoing research in particle physics.

4. What are the effects of the strong force?

The strong force has several effects, including holding the nucleus of atoms together, allowing for the formation of stable elements, and determining the properties of subatomic particles. It also plays a crucial role in nuclear fusion and nuclear fission reactions.

5. How does the strong force relate to the other fundamental forces?

The strong force is one of the four fundamental forces, along with gravity, electromagnetism, and the weak force. It is the strongest force, followed by the weak force, electromagnetism, and gravity, in order of decreasing strength. These forces work together to govern the behavior of matter at the subatomic level.

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